Hendrik-Jan Grievink

Art Director
Designer and art director, he is responsible for the visual output of most projects conducted by Next Nature Network.
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Modernist Food

Dutch artist duo Lernert & Sander cut raw food into 98 perfect 2.5 x 2.5 x 2.5 cm cubes for the Dutch newspaper De Volkskrant. This modernist food makes the future of 3D printed food look pretty tasty!

‘Cubes’ by Lernert & Sander / C-print / 50 x 40 cm / 2014


Computer Generated… Errrmm?

Some days ago, this image was posted on Reddit.com with the alluring title “This image was generated by a computer on its own (from a friend working on AI)”. It portrays a computer generated representation of what seems to be some kind of squirrel-meets-sea-lion-meets-slug-type of creature.

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‘Flowerworks’, by Sara Illenberger. Photography: Sabrina Rynas

Happy Next Nature!

Time measurement tools are perhaps among the most inventive technologies mankind has produced, as it enables us to articulate ‘natural’ time (in the form of lunar years, sun eclipse, tidal waves, seasons and of course the day and night rhythm) in measurable units of milliseconds, hours, days, weeks months and years. A process most of us tend to perceive as ‘natural’ but is in fact highly constructed. A calendar year has just passed and a new one has just started, time goes by but evolution goes on. I wish you a very livable Next Nature and a happy new year!

Image: ‘Flowerworks’ by Sarah Illenberger (photography: Sabrina Rynas)


Next Nature Emergency Blanket

In 1964, NASA developed a new material consisting of a thin sheet of plastic, coated with a metallic reflecting agent. A thin sheet of plastic coated with a metallic reflecting agent proved resistance to the hostile space environment, large temperature range and resistance to ultraviolet radiation. As a spinoff, this material is now widely used as ‘survival’ blanket in emergency situations or extreme sports, usually to protects its users against forces of ‘old’ nature (cold, heat, rain, wind).

This Next Nature Survival Blanket however, protects against the forces of next nature: drone attacks, electrosmog, internet fail, et cetera.

Concept: Koert van Mensvoort, Hendrik-Jan Grievink
Design: Hendrik-Jan Grievink

The Next Nature Emergency Blanket is especially developed for the exhibition Welcome to the Anthropocene: The Earth in Our Hands at the Deutsches Museum in Munich (Germany) which runs from December 5, 2014 to January 31, 2016.

Boomeranged Metaphors

Predator VS Alien

Your backyard is a dangerous place. Peculiar image of the week.


Miracles Happen… Again

Ever landed in that weird part of the internet where you click your way from alien abduction and ghost appearances to mermaids washed ashore? Think of this napkin sketch.


Technology Reflexology

People have complex relationships with their own (and other’s) bodies. In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), it is believed that your feet are a map of your body and can provide valuable information about your physical condition – when you are able to read them, of course.

Some people experience ghost limbs that have long been amputated, or have out-of-body experiences, whereas prosthesis can feel completely natural. On the other hand, many people experience a sense of detachment, or alienation, by the technology that surrounds them. Will we ever experience technology not only as extensions of our body, but as part of our body? Peculiar image by Lieke de Blank.


Show Dem Guts

Sexy girls and organ meat was never a good combination to me, but the people from Black Milk Clothing that created this swimsuit seem to think it makes a pretty nice product. Am I too post-human already to understand, or is it just my anthropomorphobia that plagues me?

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Peculiar Transportations


Last friday, these curious next natural transportations happened around our office in Amsterdam. All within the timeframe of a few hours. The surrealists where right. Have a nice weekend.

Boomeranged Metaphors

Belief System Meets Operating System

The image above depicts two seemingly Indian men sitting in front of what looks like an improvised temple or shrine for the hindu goddess Saraswati. What makes the image curious, is that the façade of the temple is constructed from a large-scale print of a Facebook Wall, dedicated to the deity. Do we have a Boomeranged Metaphor here or is it time to coin a new term: the Reincarnated Interface?

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shopping mall

Why Shopping Malls Are Confusing

You walk into a shopping mall, your intentions firmly focused on finding a sensible pair of shoes or a replacement t-shirt. You glance around, suddenly disorientated by the visual cacophony of stores, carts, water fountains and crowds. Hours later, you leave the mall laden with bags of stuff you didn’t plan on buying. What happened?

The Jerde transfer refers to shopping center design that is intentionally confusing and overstimulating. According to the sociologist Giandomenico Amendola, “Amplification, bombardment of the senses, entertainment, are the means by which City Walk or Fremont Street change the modern flaneur into an addicted consumer… Design principles [of the Jerde transfer] are chaos and incoherence…” Commercial structures that might seem designed for utility or convenience are actually created in order to manipulate us into opening our wallets. Welcome to the natural habitat of capitalism.

Image via The Daily Mail.

Innovative Nostalgia


As technology progresses we constantly have to adapt ourselves to new gadgets, yet occasionally, we need a gadget that feeds on our nostalgic sensibilities.

Miss the soothing clacking of typewriter keys? Long for satisfying clang of a carriage return? The iTypewriter, created by industrial designer Austin Yang, adds the old-fashioned typewriter feeling to your iPad, allowing you to relive those Mad Men days, or ensure that everyone in the library hates you by the time you hit ‘send’.


In the (Physical) Cloud

Could this be my external hard disk? By combining smoke, moisture and dramatic lighting, Dutch artist Berndnaut Smilde created this cloud, an extremely temporary work.

Amazon in Rugeley for the Financial Times Magazine

World’s Worst Job? Being a Human Robot at Amazon’s Fulfillment Center

Amazon.com’s fulfillment center in Rugeley, England, is a sterile kingdom where the algorithm is king – and humans do their best to perform its bidding. Workers’ every movement is dictated by a tracking algorithm, which can send them on trips of up to 24 kilometers per day on the quest for packages. The silence is total. Workers can be fired for talking, even as smiling cardboard cutouts remind them that “this is the best job I’ve ever had!”.

With zero-hour contracts – and jobs that evaporate from one day to the next – workers are treated more like cogs than humans. According to photojournalist Ben Roberts, who chronicled the Rugeley center in Amazon Unpacked, “the only reason Amazon doesn’t actually replace them with robots is they’ve yet to find a machine that can handle so many different sized packages.” It’s dismal proof that if we don’t domesticate technology, it ends up domesticating us.

Read more at Fast Company.

Back to the Tribe

Roulette for Your Facebook Account

Remember the Web 2.0 Suicide Machine? That was for those who where fed up with only speaking with their families online, liking their own holiday pictures and spending warm summer days compulsively checking status updates from better, cooler, more successful friends. It’s now three years on, and social media have become an even more inescapable part of our everyday routine. If you’re still in doubt about whether or not to end your Facebook life, there’s now the game of Social Roulette. According to co-founder Kyle McDonald:

“Social Roulette has a 1 in 6 chance of deleting your account, and a 5 in 6 chance that it just posts “I played Social Roulette and survived” to your timeline. […] Everyone thinks about deleting their account at some point, it’s a completely normal reaction to the overwhelming nature of digital culture. Is it time to consider a new development in your life? Are you looking for the opportunity to start fresh? Or are you just seeking cheap thrills at the expense of your social network? Maybe it’s time for you to play Social Roulette.”

I’m waiting for the 21st century version of the Deer Hunter.


A Lifetime of Questions through Google

Using a screen capture tool and Google’s home page, Marius Budin has created a video that presents the true fears of humanity over the course of a lifetime. By simply typing the phrase “I’m [X] and,” inserting the numbers 10 through 85, Marius reveals humanity’s basest insecurities, which seem to center around pregnancy and virginity. These results are compiled using the closely guarded Google search API which means that these exact search terms have been entered hundreds, thousands or even millions of times before.

It appears that we are often searching for the same answers. It is interesting to note our habitual response is now to search google for answers to life’s existential questions, rather than turning to a qualified professional or even just a friend for help. As with “Deliver us from Digital Bluntness“, this appears to be evidence of a shift in human interaction directly related to technology. In a sense, our fear of judgement means we would rather seek out help from potentially unreliable, unkind or even fake strangers than go to the people we actually know.

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Media Schemas

Six Tweet Under: Live Forever via Twitter

With the slogan “when your heart stops breathing, you’ll keep tweeting”, the developers of LivesOn claim that your Twitter account can keep tweeting forever, similar to the way you tweeted, after you die. According to the website, the LivesOn artificial intelligence engine analyzes your Twitter feed, learning your interests and syntax to ‘train’ itself to become an online reflection of you. In contrast to other managers of your social media afterlife, LivesOn mimics your personality to pretend that you never even died. Your followers might not even notice the difference.

LivesOn is developed by Lean Mean Fighting Machine, in collaboration with Queen Mary, University of London. Currently the website allows pre-subscriptions but has not announced an official launch.