Hendrik-Jan Grievink

Art Director
Designer and art director, he is responsible for the visual output of most projects conducted by Next Nature Network.
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Modern Cave Painting

Primitive man lived in caves. He used the surface of these caves as a canvas (*) to make representations of the things that surrounded him: animals and hunting, stories of magic and ritual, which helped him to make sense of the world.

Over the years, his cave has changed quite a bit: today, it comes on four wheels and in bright, shiny colors. In their turn, tribes of other cavemen use them as canvasses for their own art. An art which in itself has become more primitive and abstract, or minimal and conceptual if you want. It doesn’t nessecarily want to tell a story, or say something about the world outside the cave. Rather, it seems to refer to the cave itself. Instead of making representations of magic and rites, the creative act itself has become the ritual. Now drive me back to the tribe!

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Break Time by Stephenpperry

“Responsive Typography” Tracks Your Location to Automatically Resize Text

Web designer  Marko Dugonji? has created a website called “Responsive Typography” that alters the size of the text based on your distance from the screen. As a simple working prototype, Responsive Typography shows us some of the untapped potential of physical interactions with soft wear. Imagine moving away from your screen to get a drink and watching as it magnifies the text so you can read your email from afar, or a computer that goes to sleep when you leave a room and wakes when you return.

It’s fascinating to think of computers becoming more responsive to our bodies as a whole, but with the increasing prevalence of facial recognition these interactions could be taken even deeper. If the computer recognized your face was sad, it might change your music playlist to something cheerier, or send your friend a message to give you a call. If it realized you were getting tired, could it tell you when to take a break? Or open the blinds to let in a little more daylight?

Dugonji?’s tool shows the range of untapped design potential that is already built into webcams, and bodes for an exciting interactive computing future.


Portal to the Internets

Is this progressively nostalgic telephone booth the smallest internet café in Asia,  an exit from the Matrix, or did Dr. Who just get his car pimped? You say!

Peculiar picture taken by Arnoud Traa in Shanghai

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Twitter Followers as Currency

Imagine what you could do if you had one million Twitter followers. You would be so rich! Now seriously: Are followers becoming an alternative currency? Perhaps, although we are still awaiting the day that you can walk into a bakery and routinely buy a loaf of bread with your Twitter following. Scratch to win. Or if you don’t believe in lotteries, you can simply buy one million twitter followers for only $8295.

Image by Julian Bleecker.


IKEA Lamp Catches Elephantiasis Virus

Have you heard of Elephantiasis? It is a disease caused by microscopic parasitic worms that cause a thickening of the skin and underlying tissues. The disease typically occurs in tropical regions, however, as it seems it recently transferred to consumer products.

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A Winery in your Microwave

A delicious Montepulciano in only 6 seconds? This is now possible with the universal Nano wine. All you need is a microwave oven.

In 5,64 seconds at 1000 watt you have a sublime Romanée-Conti. Or create a surprisingly young Mouton-Rothschild 1945 in only 2,34 seconds at 650 watt. The possibilities are endless. The wine contains millions of nano capsules which depending on your mood and taste preferences can be activated by microwaves. Inactivated nano capsules move unnoticed through the body, while the opened capsules alter the taste, smell and color of the wine. Sweet!

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Featured Page #01: Hypernature

During the coming weeks, we will present a selection of our favourite pages from the Next Nature book. To kick the series off, we’ll start with a spread about hypernature; the enhanced version of nature.

Much of the so-called ‘nature’ in our lives has taken on an artificial authenticity. Engineered tomatoes are redder, rounder, and larger than the ones from our gardens. Domestic pets could not survive in the wild, but prosper by triggering our empathy. We have made fluorescent fish, rainbow tulips and botanical gardens that contain species from every corner of the globe.

Human design has turned nature into hypernature, an exaggerated simulation of a nature that never existed. It’s better than the original, a little bit prettier and slicker, safer and more convenient. Hypernature emerges where the born and the made meet. It presents itself as nature, yet arguably, it is culture in disguise.

Note from the editor: This spread is a perfect example of the relation between this website and our Next Nature book. Over the years, we have posted several stories about hypernature, but we never really pinned the term down. The editing process of the book allowed us to study it much better and come to a better understanding of what it is, and how it should be described. Which in return resulted in the thematic sections you can find on this website, like this one about hypernature.


Featured here are pages 124-125 from the book Next Nature: Nature Changes Along with Us. More information about the book can be found here.


A Clockwork Forest

Has nature become a fairytale or do we want it to be one? In their installation The Clockwork Forest, artist collective Greyworld seems to opt for the latter.

The work of art consists of a giant golden key attached to a living tree in a forest, giving it a nice theme-park aesthetic. When the key is turned, the tree plays a fairy-tale-ish lullaby and the suggestion of a wind-up tree is playfully evoked. Close your eyes, and you’ll see goblins and unicorns running through the damp forest. It’s magic…

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Nano Supermarket

Nano in Milano

Hello designers and design-lovers! The NANO Supermarket has arrived at the Salone in Milan, Italy. From today (april 18th) until sunday (april 22nd), we will present our speculative products in our mobile supermarket bus posted at the front entrance of Studio Zeta, Via Friuli 26, 20135 Milan, Italy (map).

Opening hours:
Wed 4/18: 11 AM – 7 PM
Thu 4/19: 9 AM – 7 PM
Fri 4/20: 9 AM – 7 PM
Sat 4/21: 9 AM – 7 PM
Sun 4/22: 11 AM – 5 PM


Corpus 2.1

Could you imagine yourself having QR-code freckles, or a chlorophyl skin? Dutch artist Marcia Nolte visualises these kind of speculative scenarios in a very non-spectacular yet beautiful way. This Corpus 2.1 series is a follow-up to her earlier Corpus 2.0 series, of which we also featured a stunning image in our book.

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Screw Technology

In this particular piece of video art, loyal readers of nextnature.net might recognise the building as Zeche Zollverein in Germany, where we organized the Biggest Visual Power Show in 2006. Others might see an antropomorphobic turn on the artistic genre of the tableau vivant baptised ‘The Humping Pact’ and made by artists Diego Agullo’s and Dmitry Paranyushkin’s. A dead industrial space is brought back to life by elementary  human interaction in quite a mechanical fashion, an artists fantasy that seems to merge notions of industrial-age cybersex with the idea of the conception of what German techno-pioneers Kraftwerk would call: the man-machine. The subtext: fuck technology?

More information about the artwork here.
Via Teun Castelein


Search Where the Sun don’t Shine

You’re spending too much of your time in the sewers of the internet, planning to pigeon-rank your toilet visits or you’re simply feeling lucky? This peculiar shanzhai’d toilet paper might be for you. Made out of 100% virgin pulp, so no trees have died to whipe your behind.


When Siri met Siri…

Like with pets and babies, we seem to like it when devices mimic our behaviour and social patterns. In the process of domesticating technology, we teach products to behave like ourselves. But we all know that almost every learning process starts with copying…

Earlier this year we have written about Siri, a relatively new feature in Apples iOS that allows users to control their iPhones with their voices in a quite convincing way. Especially the ‘intelligent’ answers Siri gave to questions stole many users hearts.
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The Hollywood Megamercial

Baudrillard wrote that, “Disneyland is presented as imaginary in order to make us believe that the rest is real, whereas Los Angeles [is] no longer real, but belongs to the hyperreal order and to the order of simulation.” (Simulacra & Simulation, 1994).

This movieclip of the shoe brand DC is like the Disneyland for adolescent males and takes the whole idea of a commercial to another level. A new genre is presented here, situated in the Simulacra County of Universal Studios: the Megamercial.


Next Nature Kills

Today, 122 years ago, on 13 september 1899, Henry Bliss became the first pedestrian known to be killed by an automobile in North America. Although not the first, he was certainly not the last victim of this invention that would soon be part of our next nature.

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Beyond Recognition @ Sameheads Gallery, Berlin

Coming saturday, your faithful Next Nature editor/designer Hendrik-Jan Grievink will perform Beyond Recognition – a corporate poem about the image of words, at Sameheads Gallery in Berlin. It would be nice to see you there, if you happen to be in Berlin…
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