Author: Jennifer

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Food Technology

Algae in the Supermarket

As mentioned earlier, the world seems obsessed with algae. Not limited to producing light or energy, algae has also found its way to our plate as a new vegetable, and maybe even…

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Anthropocene

Urban Heat Causes Trees to Grow Faster

The high temperatures of urban environments causes trees to grow faster in the city than in rural areas. Researchers at Columbia’s Earth Institute have discovered this by planting seedlings of the American…

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Meat the Future

Hybrid Meat

On society’s search to becoming a meatless one, several new kinds of ‘meat’ pop up in the food industry. From so called ‘hybrid’ meatballs, to ‘the chicken that isn’t’, when will we…

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artificial wetlands
Fake-nature

The Benefits of Artificial Wetlands

In 1994 researchers at Ohio State University created two artificial wetlands*  in riverine basins in order to investigate their possible benefits, and whether they could replace those lost to environmental degradation. A key benefit would be the cleaning and filtering of polluted water.

The Mississippi watershed, like many other watershed regions, is affected by chemicals that turn about 7000 square miles of the Gulf of Mexico into a so-called ‘dead zone‘. This dead zone suffers from hypoxia, a condition that occurs when nitrates and phosphorus from fertilizers cause excessive growth of algae. These algal blooms deplete the water of almost all oxygen, making it dangerous for fish and other animals. Ohio State University wanted to find out if the design of these artificial wetlands would work.

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