Food Technology

Seaweed That Tastes Like Bacon

An algae with bacon flavor, high nutritional value and rich in protein? Sounds like a speculative dish from the Bistro In Vitro, but it’s already existing: it’s dulse. Scientists at Oregon State University have been working to engineer and harvest a unique variety of dulse that, when fried, tastes just like the fatty, tasty pork belly but with greater health benefits.

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Boomeranged Metaphors

Analogue vs Digital: Boomeranged Metaphors

The photo at the top is not captured in Google street view. It is a giant Google map pin in the middle of an analog city. At the start of the digital era, metaphors from everyday analog life – like map pins – were used in order to make new technology acceptable. Google could have come up with any icon to mark a location. But they didn’t, because they wanted us to understand their digital version of maps. Some years later, this typical digital map pin has proven itself. It has proven itself that much that it even pops up into the analog world. Is it analog, or is it digital? It’s a boomeranged metaphor!

From the Analogue vs Digital Memory Game


Hearing Colors

Neil Harbisson is an artist who sees everything in grayscale due to a condition called achromatopsia or total color blindness. He may not see the range of shades but he hears them in vivid colors, thanks to an antenna implanted in his skull.
“I’ve been a cyborg for 10 years now.  I don’t feel like I’m using technology, or wearing technology. I feel like I am technology. I don’t think of my antenna as a device – it’s a body part”.

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Knotty Objects Summit @ MIT

The Knotty Object summit promises to be a paradise of anti-disciplinary delight. The event held at the renowned MIT Media Lab gathers designers, scientists, engineers and writers around the discussion of four complex and omnipresent objects and the stories they tell.

The knotty objects–brick, bitcoin, steak, and phone–are employed as lenses through which we examine the current state of our society as well as the crossovers between design and technology. Speakers include Paola Antonelli, Tony Dunne, Fiona Raby, Kevin Slavin, Neri Oxman, Isha Dahar, Revital Cohen, Daisy Ginsberg and our own Koert van Mensvoort.

Wednesday and Thursday, July 15-16, at the Boston ICA and Media Lab. Video streamed all over the planet.

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Forward to Nature

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Virtual worlds, printed food, living cities, wild robots – we’re so surrounded by technology that it’s becoming our next nature. How can we live in harmony with it? The Next Nature Network is a 21st century nature organization that wants to go forward – not back – to nature. We stir debate, create events, exhibitions, publications and products that bring biology and technology into balance. Because ultimately, we may not just have to save the pandas but the people too. Will you join us?

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Food Technology

Everything Stew from the Home Incubator

This dish, a stew made with thirteen different sorts of meat, is heaven for carnivores. It is made in the Bistro In Vitro home incubator, an appliance with a set of pre-programmed types of meat types, flavours and textures. For our adventurous chefs, the incubator is the ideal access to a culinary Walhalla in which the boundaries between meats are erased, with this dish as its crowning achievement.

Chose your menu at www.bistro-invitro.com!


Analogue vs Digital: News, Now and Then

The digital revolution had a great influence on the publishing industry. Not only has the medium changed from paper to the screen, but also reporting has changed tremendously. We no longer hear and believe the authorized voices of a newspaper. And we no longer have to wait until the next morning to read what happened the day before. A news reaches us the minute it happens, by different channels, and from a lot voices. We are all journalists in a century in which Twitter is the main news outlet.

From the Analogue vs Digital Memory Game

Suburban Utopia

Surveillance Gulls

From far away Czech artist Jakub Geltner‘s latest work appears as a flock of seagulls gathered on rocks. Looking closer your realize they are not perched birds, but surveillance cameras the artist has set up as a part of his series Nest.

This installation, titled Nest 05, explores the notion of surveillance in even our most peaceful places, the areas we seek when we want to escape. Geltner focuses on the growing presence of cameras cities, letting viewers decide whether or not that presence is desirable.

Source: The Creators Project


Eco Currency Questions

In December 2014 Radiolab had a show about Worth. The third segment discussed possibilities to put a price-tag on nature, and what this would implicate. Another interesting perspective on an eco-currency. In their own words:

“Back in 1997, a team of scientists slapped a giant price tag on the earth. They calculated the dollar value of every ecosystem on the planet, and tallied it all up: 142.7 trillion dollars. It’s a powerful form of sticker shock — one that could give environmentalists ammunition to protect wetlands and save forests. But some people argue it actually devalues something that should be seen as priceless. Then the apple farmers of Mao county in central China turn this whole debate upside down and make us question the value of understanding nature in terms of dollars and cents.”

Listen to the story here. Image via Shutterstock.


Art Installation Submerges Amsterdam

“God created the earth, but the Dutch created the Netherlands” Voltaire said in the 18th century. Waterlicht is a recent project by Dutch artist Daan Roosegaarde that reminds us about this quote and therefore how humans have had an impact on the landscape of the Netherlands.

As a virtual flood submerging Museum Square in Amsterdam, Waterlicht shows how high the water could reach in the Dutch capital without human intervention.

“Waterlicht shows how the Netherlands looks like without waterworks — a virtual flood. Innovation is seen throughout our landscape, pushed by the waterworks and our history, but yet we almost seem to have forgotten this” says Daan Roosegaarde.

The Rijksmuseum recent acquisition of the 17th century painting by Jan Asselijndepicting the 1651 Amsterdam flood was the impetus for the exhibition over Museum Square. Both pieces reflect on the water history of the Netherlands and the interaction between man, nature and technology.

Story via TheVerge. Photos and video via Studio Roosegaarde.