Permanent Eye-Color Change

The reason why blue eyes are considered so appealing is unknown. Researchers ascribe this widespread appreciation to the Paleolithic society, where the few women with blue eyes had better chances of standing out in the crowd; others think it’s due to the fact that pupil dilatation, an indicator of attraction, is more visible in lighter eyes.

Only 17% of the world’s population has blue eyes, the rest can obtain cerulean eyes just with the help of colored contact lenses. But today a new laser surgery can permanently turn eyes from brown to blue.

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Dynamic Exoskeleton Chair

Prolonged sitting is a common feature in today’s society. Despite the amount of movements our body is capable of, we spend most of our time in sedentary mode.

To respond to the anti-physical modern technology trends, Eindhoven Design Academy graduate Govert Flint developed the Segregation of Joy project. He designed an exoskeleton chair that allows the body to move freely. The user can control the cursor on his computer screen by moving his body in the chair.

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Forward to Nature

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Virtual worlds, printed food, living cities, wild robots – we’re so surrounded by technology that it’s becoming our next nature. How can we live in harmony with it? The Next Nature Network is a 21st century nature organization that wants to go forward – not back – to nature. We stir debate, create events, exhibitions, publications and products that bring biology and technology into balance. Because ultimately, we may not just have to save the pandas but the people too. Will you join us?

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The Emergence of 4D Printing

The way we build our structures has become more and more sophisticated over the last decades. But the materials used are always static, waiting for us to fit them to the required shape. What if structures could assemble themselves and change form autonomously?

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Wild Systems

Gameplay of the Crowds

Over a year ago an anonymous Australian programmer started a social experiment called “Twitch Plays Pokémon”. The experiment consisted of a video stream on Twitch of the video game Pokémon Red. Viewers could interact with the video game by sending commands through the chat room of the stream which controlled the avatar of the game in real time. After more than 16 days of continuous playing, the game was completed.

When the experiment started, a few hundred people were watching. However, soon enough the internet caught on and the stream became unexpectedly popular. Instead of a few hundred, tens of thousands of people were watching.
During the remainder of the experiment, an average of 80,000 concurrent viewers was achieved, with a peak of 121,000 simultaneous viewers.
Within days, the experiment spawned many in-jokes, memes and even its own mythology around a specific item that was obtained during the play through. It became a culture of its own.

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