Koert van Mensvoort will discuss Meat the Future on Tuesday October 25 at Natlab in Eindhoven, as part of a lecture series that centers on the topic of design thinking. Join the meeting and enter the debate!
Next Nature

Koert van Mensvoort on Meat the Future

To make a hamburger of 200 grams you need: three kilograms of grain and forage, 200 liters of water for land irrigation and livestock drinking, seven square meters for grazing and cultivating feed crops and 1.093 kilojoule of fossil energy to grow and transport feed (enough to power your microwave for 18 minutes). Keeping in mind the continuous growth of the world’s population, we need to find alternatives to the traditional meat production. One of them could be in vitro meat.

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Wild Systems

Painted by Drones

After graffiti drones in 2014, German aerial-photography group Cooper Copter is exploring “vandalism 2.0” with drones that throw paint bombs after Reeperbahn Festival invited the collective to develop a performance. The so-called Pollockocopter horizontally fires paint bombs at an enormous screen at a speed of 30 km/h and mimics the action-painting technique of Jackson Pollock, while simultaneously creating something new.

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Meat the Future

Meat the Future Exhibition

The Cube Design Museum in Kerkrade, in the south of The Netherlands, just opened a new exhibition where we discuss the future of in vitro meat. The opening coincided with the second International Conference on Cultured Meat held in Maastricht. It was a unique oportunity to gather scientists, designers and theorists to talk about possible scenarios for lab-grown meat production.

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Intimate Technology

Will We Share .thought Files?

Don’t we all wish to look into someone else’s mind every once in a while? With the evolving technique called EEG, electroencephalography, we can measure brain activity and ultimately even read the brain. The newest inventions are becoming more and more portable, ready to be implemented into our everyday life.

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James Bridle is comparing vast amounts of historical weather data and polling results in order to produce hybrid weather forecasts.
Information Decoration

A Political Weather Forecast

What happens when natural clouds are combined with cloud computing? Artist and writer James Bridle is exploring artificial intelligence, Brexit and the weather. By comparing vast amounts of historical weather data and polling results, Cloud Index uses machine learning in order to produce hybrid weather forecasts and questions on how communication technologies function in predicting, thus controlling, our future.

Peculiar image of the week. Via Twitter