Genetic-surprises

Scientists want to create human-cow hybrid

Scientists in the UK applied for permission to create part-cow, part-human embryos for research aimed at treating diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. The embryos created from this process would then be almost entirely “human”, with the only cow DNA being outside the cells’ nuclei. The human-bovine embryos would not be allowed to develop for more than a few days, the researchers say.

The proposal has been questioned by some ethics campaigners, who claim it could blur the line between animals and humans.
Read more: newscientist.com

Anthropomorphobia

Metalosis Maligna

Metalosis Maligna is a documentary by Floris Kaayk about a disease which affects patients with medical implants. Sourcing from such implants a wild metal growth ultimately transforms human patients into mechanical looking constructions.

Hypernature

Real Nature is not Green

At the edge of the woods along the motorway near the Dutch town of Bloemendaal, there stands a mobile telephone mast disguised as a pine tree. This mast is not nature: at best, it is a picture of nature. It is an illustration, like a landscape painting hanging over the sofa. Do we have genuine experiences of nature any more? Or are we living in a picture of it?

Read more (32 replies)

Digital-Presence

Harvesting traffic information through GSM’s

TomTom and Vodaphone want to use mobile phone signals sent from traffic jams to gather real-time travel information. The data will be used for TomTom users to establish if roads are congested, if and by how much the trip will be delayed, and if alternative routes can be suggested. Mobile phones continuously beam signals to their nearest base stations, which gives the network provider the approximate location of the phone.

Mobile phone penetration is more than 100 percent in the Netherlands, meaning that every person carries one or more mobile phones. The service will be available in the Netherlands in the second half of 2007, using the Dutch Vodafone network. I wonder how they deal with carpooling? Read more at PCPro news.

Guided Growth

E-volver

The E-volver is an ‘image breeding machine’, which takes inspiration from the methods of evolutionary biology to produce colourful,ever-changing images. The software generates artificial pixel organisms made up of thirteen genes that together determine how the organism will behave on the monitor. The unusual collaboration between an “image-breeding-machine” and a human “gardener” results in intriging and coherent images.

E-volver will be exhibited at the Natural Habitat expo which opens this weekend during the Amsterdam Museumnacht.

Next n8 Nature

During the upcoming Amsterdam Museumnight, the Institute for Timebased Arts (Montevideo) will be hosting a show called Natural Habitat, in which artists play with the borders between nature, culture and technology. The show focusses on a positive view on next nature. A compilation of the Next Nature Biggest Visual Power Show, held in June will be screened.

More info about museumnacht on the n8 site (only in Dutch). November 4 2006, 15.00 – 02.00.

Digital-Presence

Handsets gets taken to the grave

More people than ever are asking to be buried or cremated with their mobile phones when they die. The trend, which began in South Africa, has now spread to a number of countries, including Ireland, Australia, Ghana, and the US.

“People want to be buried with the totems that they feel represents their lifestyle.”

“We came across one guy who asked to be buried with his mobile phone and his Blackberry, and also with his laptop.” , thus Martin Raymond, director of international trend-spotting think-tank, The Future Laboratory.

news.bbc.co.uk

Hyperreality

fully automated news bulletin

News at Seven is a set of preferences for what a newsreport should be about. Using keywords entered by the user, the program selects news site RSS feeds and specific stories to focus on. The stories are edited for length and changed to make them more colloquial and suited to speech. News at Seven uses images and videos on sites like YouTube and Google Video. Further the software looks for words and phrases indicative of emotional impact. Finally a script is generated from the collated matereial. Text-to-speech software then lets animated characters take on the role of news anchors, with pictures and videos shown on a screen behind them. But news may also be read out like this.
found at: infolab.northwestern.edu | newscientisttech.com

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