Dynamic-architecture

Pig City

The Netherlands produces some 16.5 million tons of pig meat each year, making it the European Union’s leading exporter. In 1999 there were officially 15.2 million pigs in the country, and 15.5 million people. Each pig requires 664 square metres of space, including that required for meat processing.

The Rotterdam architecture office MVRDV studied ways to streamline production in the intensive pig farming sector. Animal welfare and efficient land use were important factors in developing the concept. The result is Pig City: tall towers in which pigs spend their entire lives.

www.architechtenweb.nl

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Biopolitics

Ideology becomes nature

Is this fake nature? Surely, it’s nature altered by human hands. Somewhere in the East German forest these trees started to change color in autumn a little earlier than all the surrounding trees. Year after year. They where put there by some freak years ago but where only recently cut down.

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Digital-Presence

From Silver Screen to Computer Screen

Fans of The Sims video game spent the Oscar Sunday evening making virtual copies of the red carpet fashions worn by Oscar winner Reese Witherspoon, contender Keira Knightley and presenter and trend setter Jennifer Lopez, then offering them for free trade Monday.

Players of The Sims games create and control simulated people, doing everything from dressing them to guiding them through social situations. Of the Oscar dresses made available for free download on the game’s community website Knightley’s aubergine Vera Wang sheath was the most downloaded, followed by the virtual rendition of Witherspoon’s original Christian Dior Haute Couture dress.

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The-map-is-the-territory

Surfing the marble

The world is flat again! Here’s how the worlds largest search engine company describes its newest toy: To put it simply, Like a game community, Google Earth is growing its own: thousands of people every day, scratching the marble, looking for that state secret bunker and alien vessel launching facility.

Google Earth next nature? The point is: we are getting to know our planet so much better now that it is downloadable.

www.theregister.co.uk/2005/09/13/google_earth_threatens_democracy/
www.theregister.co.uk/2006/02/06/greenwich_meridian/
www.theregister.co.uk/2006/01/09/google_lancaster/

If you don’t want to download Google Earth: www.flashearth.com

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Made-to-debate

Utility Pets

In the not-so-distant future people will be given a pig with their own DNA engineered into it. The pig, known as a “knockout” pig in the scientific jargon, is a form of living insurance policy – an organ bank.

The Utility Pets project explores what kind of new objects might be needed if the pig lives in the home with its owner’s family. Utility Pets draws attention to the ethical consequenses of xenotransplantation – the transplantation of animal organs into humans.

www.eliocaccavale.com

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Calm-technology

Cameleon concept car

The GloCar uses LED lights to change body panel colours, intensity and frequency. A driver can thus choose at will to either stand out or blend in. Alongside the cosmetic value come significant safety benefits. Over 60% of accidents occur at junctions at night. Iluminated by translucent plastic panels and LED lights, the GloCar offers enhanced visibility. When a car comes too close, the panels increase in intensity, signaling to the driver to keep a distance. A further safety benefits comes from the fact that the GloCar can be seen from all angles, not just headlights and taillights. The rear panel doubles up as a brake light, and the side panels as indicators.

Powered by fuel cell technology, the GloCar offers environmental benefits over conventional cars. It potentially eliminates the need for vehicle paint and cuts down on waste. It also simplifies manufacturing, as only one version of the vehicle is produced – ironically, the same advantage Henry derived from stipulating the single colour black in the early days!

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