Tag: Anthropocene

bird
Plastic Planet

Eating Plastic or Krill: a Smelly Story for Birds

On of the evidences of the Anthropocene is plastic pollution, which in particular affects oceans and marine ecosystems. However, plastics not only accumulate in the seas. You can also find it undigested in the stomach of birds. Why birds are not able to choose between eating a fresh fish or the cap of a plastic bottle? Well, if you wait long enough plastic starts to smell like bird food.

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Ecosexuality reconceptualizes our perspective on the biosphere by having consensual experiences with it.
Anthropocene

Ecosexuality: Make the Biosphere Your Lover

Are you yearning for real connection? Are you longing for sanctuary with nature? Are you willing to embrace the Earth as your lover? These questions set the right mood to introduce the first part of The Sex Spectrum, a seven part series to explore alternative sexual identities and challenge the social and cultural dominant dimensions. First up is ecosexuality, a growing movement rooted in art and activism at the intersection of sexuality and ecology. Additionally, some consider ecosexuality their sexual identity, in which the biosphere becomes their lover.

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netherlands_before_the_dykes
Anthropocene

Holland Before the Dikes

Oh no! What do we have here? A map of The Netherlands with all its major cities – Amsterdam, Rotterdam, The Hague, Utrecht, Almere – flooded and vanished into the ocean. Must be a speculative rendering of what happens when climate change kicks in and ocean levels rise. Is this our future? Think again, this is what some historians believe our past was, long before people started building dikes in the lowlands.

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View of Earth from the surface of Mars
Image Consumption

Greetings from Mars

Since plans for conquering the Red Planet are becoming more serious, we should get acquainted with the possible view from up there. The distance between Mars and the Earth is about 50 milion miles. One martian year lasts approximately 687 terrestrial days, but one day is just 37 minutes longer than our 24h standard. Don’t let it fool you: Mars is not a pleasant environment at all. There are numerous aspects that make us think twice before we decide to move there.

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Suburban Utopia

Thanksgiving Getaway Gridlock

This gridlocked highway looks like a river of red and white. Yesterday, during the Thanksgiving getaway, ABC7 news channel’s helicopter captured this massive traffic jam on one of the busiest and most congested routes in the U.S., the 405 in southern California. This year in fact, a record number of Americans – nearly 49 million – traveled for the Thanksgiving holiday. In suburbia, we hope to get away from it all. Unfortunately, everyone else had the same idea. Happy Thanksgiving to our American readers!

scandinavian-winds
Suburban Utopia

The Scandinavian Winds Power Your Internet

“Googling” is so easy and straightforward that seems to be an activity that won’t cause any impact on the environment. Unfortunately it does, from the manufacture and shipping of computers to the powering and cooling of the servers, huge amounts of resources and energy are consumed. According to climatecare.org every Google search accounts for 0.2 to 0.7 grams of carbon emissions and every e-mail equals to four grams of CO2.

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Seeing more airplanes in the sky than birds
Anthropocene

What Is Next Nature? #10

One and a half century ago birds and insects were the only airborne creatures. The largest movements in the sky were, for example, swarms of starlings, migrating geese or a lone circling hawk. From the twentieth century a new entrant made its rise: aircrafts. Today 8.3 million people are held aloft by airplanes everyday. Commercial air traffic accounts for the 4% of the total global output of greenhouse gasses. Indeed, the impact on the environment is clearly visible and widespread. Near urban areas a clear blue sky without contrails is close to non-existent. Not only airplanes have become part of the visible and audible horizon, they also directly transform our landscape by creating cirrus cloud formations.

Read the entire Next Nature is… series.