Tag: Anthropocene


Seaweed Farms to Solve the Problem of Ocean Acidification

By burning fossil fuels we are responsible for the increase of carbon dioxide in the Earth’s atmosphere. Aside from raising temperatures globally, this is also affecting our oceans. The massive production of CO2 is causing ocean acidification, and the results are frightening.

Researches on this matter are quite recent and very difficult to get into, especially because it is impossible to study acidification in isolation; the results may vary depending on the amount of sunlight, temperature and the presence of oxygen. Nevertheless it has been proven that the impact on marine faune is devastating, especially for the formation of shells and coral reefs.

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Electronic Gadget Cemetery in Ghana

We love buying shiny new gadgets every now and then, but have you ever wondered where your old device ends up when you get rid of it? Agbogbloshie in Ghana is one of the places where electronics, such as computers, mobile phones and televisions, go to die.

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Art Installation Submerges Amsterdam

“God created the earth, but the Dutch created the Netherlands” Voltaire said in the 18th century. Waterlicht is a recent project by Dutch artist Daan Roosegaarde that reminds us about this quote and therefore how humans have had an impact on the landscape of the Netherlands.

As a virtual flood submerging Museum Square in Amsterdam, Waterlicht shows how high the water could reach in the Dutch capital without human intervention.

“Waterlicht shows how the Netherlands looks like without waterworks — a virtual flood. Innovation is seen throughout our landscape, pushed by the waterworks and our history, but yet we almost seem to have forgotten this” says Daan Roosegaarde.

The Rijksmuseum recent acquisition of the 17th century painting by Jan Asselijndepicting the 1651 Amsterdam flood was the impetus for the exhibition over Museum Square. Both pieces reflect on the water history of the Netherlands and the interaction between man, nature and technology.


Story via TheVerge. Photos and video via Studio Roosegaarde.


Anthropo-scene #10: From Thoughts to Geology

It’s more than two years since I have started this exploration of the Anthropocene for Next Nature for you. We have visited many places together, places I have traveled to as a reporter, author, biologist: we have entered a graphite mine, where ancient algae are turned into high-tech gadgets, we have discovered a former military training areas that has become a neo-natural ecosystem, we have encountered plants and birds that try to live and thrive in the new geological epoch we are about to name after ourselves, the Anthropocene. The Anthropocene will not be a smooth ride, but an exciting one.

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Anthropo-scene #9: Sense, Sensors, Sensitivity

In 1928 Alfred Döblin, one of Germany’s great authors, wrote a book that in my eyes should become part of the official intellectual ancestry of the Anthropocene. It’s called “Das Ich über der Natur”, the Self Above Nature. But it’s not about human arrogance and domination of Earth, quite the opposite. Döblin describes ways how to immerse ourselves in Nature.

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Anthropo-scene #8: Anthropocene Rabbit

I was on my bike, cycling to Berlin’s Gleisdreieck area to attend Re:publica, Germany’s hip and cool digital culture event, when a pile of rubble caught my attention. “Gleisdreieck”, or “rail track triangle”, has in recent years become a hotspot of urban development. For decades, the area had been a kind of inner-city wilderness, an urban savannah with little formal use.

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Anthropo-scene #7: Anthropocene Bird

What does it mean to be a bird in a world massively altered by human actions? This White-tailed Kite (Elanus leucurus), a beautiful raptor, is finding it out while hovering above Baylands Park near Palo Alto, California.

Humans have made not only the Dodo, but dozens of bird species, vanish from Earth in the past decades, through hunting, habitat destruction and the spread of cats, rats and dogs with the help of ships. Globally, 1300 out of a total of 10,000 bird species are seriously in decline. Other birds have learned to live with humans and profit from their presence.

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Next Nature Talk at Nature 3.x Symposium

This weekend, Next Nature Network creative director Dr. Van Mensvoort will lecture at Nature 3.x: Where is Nature Now? at University of Minnesota in Minneapolis.

The multi-disciplinary conference is co-organized by Professor Matthew Tucker and Professor Christine Baeumler at the University of Minnesota. The event will bring together professionals from various disciplines to meditate on how the global environmental problems of the Anthropocene change our involvement with nature. The discussion will include post-industrial feral landscape ecology, eco-toxic tourism, manufactured urban ecosystems, post-natural disaster resiliency planning, hypernature and technology, and genetically modified environments.

The symposium is free and public, so make sure to drop by if you live around!

Next Nature @ Nature 3.x: Where is Nature Now?
Saturday, April 18 
5 pm – 6 pm
U of MN Northrop Best Buy Theater, Minneapolis, USA


What if Humans Disappeared?

Life would normally continue with humans and their evolving surroundings, but this movie envisions what could happen if we would just disappear.

Humanity made a strong impact on the planet, but we should not underestimate the incredible power of nature. With our disappearance, animals that depend on us will suffer drastic population declines. At the same time, without human presence on Earth, some animal species that are close to extinction would suddenly grow in population. Most of our remains will decompose because of nature power initiated by fire, weeds and termites. The only thing that would remain of us would be our trash of plastic, chemicals and radioactive material. But of course the question is, why would we all of a sudden disappear?

Source: Asap SCIENCE