Tag: Anthropocene

View of Earth from the surface of Mars
Image Consumption

Greetings from Mars

Since plans for conquering the Red Planet are becoming more serious, we should get acquainted with the possible view from up there. The distance between Mars and the Earth is about 50 milion miles. One martian year lasts approximately 687 terrestrial days, but one day is just 37 minutes longer than our 24h standard. Don’t let it fool you: Mars is not a pleasant environment at all. There are numerous aspects that make us think twice before we decide to move there.

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Suburban Utopia

Thanksgiving Getaway Gridlock

This gridlocked highway looks like a river of red and white. Yesterday, during the Thanksgiving getaway, ABC7 news channel’s helicopter captured this massive traffic jam on one of the busiest and most congested routes in the U.S., the 405 in southern California. This year in fact, a record number of Americans – nearly 49 million – traveled for the Thanksgiving holiday. In suburbia, we hope to get away from it all. Unfortunately, everyone else had the same idea. Happy Thanksgiving to our American readers!

Suburban Utopia

The Scandinavian Winds Power Your Internet

“Googling” is so easy and straightforward that seems to be an activity that won’t cause any impact on the environment. Unfortunately it does, from the manufacture and shipping of computers to the powering and cooling of the servers, huge amounts of resources and energy are consumed. According to climatecare.org every Google search accounts for 0.2 to 0.7 grams of carbon emissions and every e-mail equals to four grams of CO2.

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Seeing more airplanes in the sky than birds
Anthropocene

What Is Next Nature? #10

One and a half century ago birds and insects were the only airborne creatures. The largest movements in the sky were, for example, swarms of starlings, migrating geese or a lone circling hawk. From the twentieth century a new entrant made its rise: aircrafts. Today 8.3 million people are held aloft by airplanes everyday. Commercial air traffic accounts for the 4% of the total global output of greenhouse gasses. Indeed, the impact on the environment is clearly visible and widespread. Near urban areas a clear blue sky without contrails is close to non-existent. Not only airplanes have become part of the visible and audible horizon, they also directly transform our landscape by creating cirrus cloud formations.

Read the entire Next Nature is… series.

solar panels rainforest connection
Anthropocene

Old Cellphones to Fight Deforestation

The rainforest produces an extraordinary symphony that drowns out the threatening sound of the lumberjack chainsaws. To protect it, American start-up Rainforest Connection transformed recycled cell-phones into autonomous, solar-powered listening devices. This low-cost solar tracking system is able to intercept illicit activities, mainly deforestation, and alert the rangers in real time. His founder is Californian engineer Tropher White. With the help of indigenous tribes he was able to make his ambitious project operational.

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singapore ships sea humans commerce
Anthropocene

Untouched Nature Is Entirely Gone

Human impact on this planet is evident, we modified ecosystems and landscapes. Since day one of our appearance on Earth we tried to know, understand and ultimately control our surroundings. Travelers all over the world constantly look for untouched lands and real nature, although lately this is harder and harder. After a long research, scientists now say that untouched nature is almost entirely gone.

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