Tag: Anthropomorphobia

Wild Systems

This Robot Builds a House in Two Days

This Bricklaying Robot can build low-cost houses in just two days. Initially developed to meet labor shortages, at 1.000 bricks an hour the robot is perfectly capable of working on its own. The machine was named Hadrian after the fourteenth Emperor of Rome, known for his significant building projects during the Roman Empire. This new technology means more affordable houses in the future, that additionally could be filled with robotic self-assembling furniture.

Source: Fastbrick Robotics

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Suburban Utopia

Begging Ghetto Blasters Hack the System

In the city of Utrecht, the Netherlands, something strange is going on. Since a couple of years begging is prohibited there. The beggars were seen as a nuisance, disrupting the picturesque atmosphere of the old city center. Today, however, begging voices are echoing through the streets again. But this time it’s not homeless people, but ghetto blasters that do the begging.

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Anthropomorphobia

Let’s Laugh at Robots!

This video makes us laugh at how clumsy robots can be. As silly and infantile as they look, we might as well be laughing at the mischief of toddlers. Yet, to laugh at them is to anthropomorphize them. It is, in a way, to look at robots as if they had human characteristics. But in the end, these fails remind us that robots are still a long ways off.

Via Futurism

Wild Systems

Possibilities for Drones in Performing Arts

Drones, we probably have all heard about their many possible uses. Whether they’re seen as a positive development or not, these robotic birds are increasingly employed for practical task, for example in the military. But there’s a more creative application for them as well.

Japanese fashion brand Buyma created this video with a wink, wherein drones play a crucial role. Even though the drones appear to be computer-animated from time to time, it offers an interesting view on how drones could also become a part of (performing) arts in the future.

Via: Mashable

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Wild Systems

DOUG: the First Robot Able to Draw

We already talked about robot interactions with human, and we find this topic particularly actual and interesting since the way we handle this collaboration will be crucial for our future. Robots can already read, talk and reason. Yet, they do not seem to have found limits to their artistic skills either. Meet DOUG_1, the drawing robot.

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Wild Systems

Jazz-Playing Robot Challenges Human-Computer Interactions

The relations between human beings and robots are reaching a whole new level, and this program is the living proof, researchers say. The name of this new project is MUSICA (Musical Improvising Collaborative Agent), and its purpose is to come up with a musical robot able to improvise a jazz solo in response to an actual person performing jazz.

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Anthropomorphobia

How Technology is Becoming More and More Sensitive

Over the past decade scientists have tried to get technology surfaces to be as sensitive as our skin, especially as our fingertips. Human tact is a very sophisticate interface between us and the external world. It is incredibly sensitive and allows us to immediately store information about the reality that surrounds us on different levels, such as pressure, temperature and texture. Researchers in Korea are now experimenting a compress electronic skin able to multitasks, like the human one, feeling temperature, pressure and sound (sound is air pressure, after all), all at once.

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