Tag: Anthropomorphobia

computer_generated_animals
Anthropomorphobia

Computer Generated… Errrmm?

Some days ago, this image was posted on Reddit.com with the alluring title “This image was generated by a computer on its own (from a friend working on AI)”. It portrays a computer generated representation of what seems to be some kind of squirrel-meets-sea-lion-meets-slug-type of creature.

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skinbook1
Anthropomorphobia

The Sketchbook Made Of Artificial Skin

Time ago the NANO Supermarket presented a speculative product called Skin Paper, an innovative paper that grows with the user’s skin cells, breaking the boundaries of the body to create a personal epidermis diary.

Perhaps Tattoo Art Magazine was inspired by this visionary project to create The SkinBook, a sketchbook made of synthetic skin that allows beginner tattooists to practice their skills, before working with clients.

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IBM_Watson
Anthropomorphobia

IBM Predicts Artificial Intelligence Future

Watson, IBM’s signature artificial-intelligence system, became famous in 2011 for beating Jeopardy! champion Ken Jennings at his own game. But now IBM has much larger plans for it.

At the World of Watson event held last week in New York, Ginni Rometty, the chairman and CEO of IBM, stood on stage in front of a packed room and announced that she was going to make “a bold prediction”.

“In the future, every decision that mankind makes is going to be informed by a cognitive system like Watson,” she said “and our lives will be better for it”.

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yangyang
Anthropomorphobia

Meet Yangyang, Actroid From China

Dressed in a full-length read coat, the humanoid robot Yangyang can function autonomously, talking and gesturing while interacting with people. Thanks to a number of tiny motors beneath her rubbery skin, she can display a wide range of facial expressions, move the head and raise the hands as a sign of greeting.

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Hotel with Robots
Anthropomorphobia

The Hotel Run by Robots

Check into a new hotel with the help of a keen robot receptionist. After welcoming you, another bot will carry your luggage to your room, earlier thoroughly cleaned by a non-human housekeeper. At the Henn-na Hotel in Japan, the so-called actroids will make sure you’ll have a nice and memorable stay.

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mario
Wild Systems

A Self-Aware Mario Able to Learn and Feel

Since his birth in 1985, our favorite plumber Mario has gone through numerous evolutions. Now it is a cult video game that exists on several platforms with many different versions. However, the latest development that Mario went through is the most exciting: the character is now able to learn and feel in the confines of his 8-bit universe.

Three researches, from the University of Tübingen in Germany, gave Mario the ability to live and converse with an adaptive learning artificial intelligence method.

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Anthropomorphobia

Lonely Sculpture Your Next Tinder Match?

Tinder users beware: somewhere out there on the Internet, a mechanical finger is surfing the popular dating smartphone app, endlessly approving profiles. This could be your next match.

The Lonely Sculpture, by Australian artist Tully Arnot, calls into question our increasingly digitized networks of relationships, illustrating how communicating via machine strips our interactions of personality and individuality.

As we become more and more dependent on technology, the lines between people and products are blurred.

technologyreflexology
Anthropomorphobia

Technology Reflexology

People have complex relationships with their own (and other’s) bodies. In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), it is believed that your feet are a map of your body and can provide valuable information about your physical condition – when you are able to read them, of course.

Some people experience ghost limbs that have long been amputated, or have out-of-body experiences, whereas prosthesis can feel completely natural. On the other hand, many people experience a sense of detachment, or alienation, by the technology that surrounds them. Will we ever experience technology not only as extensions of our body, but as part of our body? Peculiar image by Lieke de Blank.