Tag: Artificial Womb

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First Baby Incubators
Artificial Womb

1857 – The First Baby Incubators

Premature birth normally means an under-developed baby who has not yet acquired the necessary organs maturity to survive outside of mother’s womb. An incubator that partially acts as a womb extension could make the difference between life and death for the fragile newborn.

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Homunculus
Artificial Womb

1537 – Homunculus: the Semi-Human

The creation of life has always been a human fantasy. According to reports from the 16th and 17th centuries, at that time alchemists started trying to produce a fully formed miniature human body, the homunculus, from a flask.

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Emanuel M. Greenberg artificial womb patent 1955
Artificial Womb

1955 – Artificial Womb Drawing Patented

Emanuel M. Greenberg identified the issues of preemies dying due to the immaturity of their organs. He designed a system hoping to help these babies live longer. In the summer of 1955 he patented his Illustration of an artificial womb.

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term ectogenesis coined in 1923
Artificial Womb

1923 – Term ‘Ectogenesis’ Coined

Ectogenesis – the gestation of human embryos in artificial circumstances outside a human uterus is a term coined in 1923. It made its first appearance in the science fiction essay Daedalus, or, Science and the Future by British scientist J. B. S. Haldane.

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Aldous Huxley brave new world
Artificial Womb

1932 – “Brave New World” Published

In 1932, English writer Aldous Huxley published his iconic novel Brave New World. This book brought the idea of the artificial uterus to the big audience, like never before, and still holds value as one of the most significant references in the sometimes heated debates on the subject of human reproductive technologies.

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Artificial Womb

2017 – Artificial Womb Incubates Fetal Lamb

A very recent success brought the research in artificial wombs one step forward. A lamb born at the equivalent of 23 weeks in a human gestational period was kept alive in an artificial womb and developed just as if it was in a normal womb.

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Artificial Womb

Artificial Womb: the Timeline

NNN is currently researching the concept of the artificial womb and its societal impact and challenges. We started with a historic investigation of the relation between technology and biological reproduction and listed the key moments in the conception of such technology throughout time, as well as related assisted reproductive technologies. Learn more about this project and read the introductory article Ectogenesis, Artificial Womb, Human Egg.

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Artificial Womb

Ectogenesis, Artificial Womb, Human Egg

Humanity is facing the disconnection between biological reproduction and the body, facilitated by the emerging technology of the Artificial Womb. Envisioned in bleak science fiction scenarios many times in the past, this technology is about to become a reality in our present. But how will it affect our culture – and how should that new culture be designed? If birds lay eggs, why shouldn’t humans do that, too?

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