Tag: Back to the Tribe

Back to the Tribe

Tristes Tropiques

Back in 1955 French cultural anthropologist Claude Lévi-Strauss0 published Tristes Tropiques, a book documenting his encounters with Brazilian tribes. Some 65 years later, artists Laurence Aëgerter & Ronald van Tienhoven set out for a reenactment with a group of inhabitants from Beetsterzwaag, a village in the region of Frysia (NL).

The photo’s learn us that, although we might feel our lives differ greatly from those of our ancestors, some of the most important aspect of life remain unchanged.

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cockroach farming
Back to the Tribe

Cockroach Farms Do Big Business for Food and Pharmaceuticals

The secret ingredient in Chinese traditional medicine? Ground-up cockroach. Many farmers in China are turning to one of the world’s most reviled bugs to make big bucks. They’re cheap to feed (they live on rotting vegetables), easy to kill (dunk them in boiling water) and easy to store (dry them in the sun). Farmers are making a healthy profit selling the roaches to researchers studying whether the pulverized insects can be used to cure baldness, AIDS and cancer. They also wind up as fish food and even, sometimes, as deep-fried snacks for humans.

Read more about roach ranching at the LA Times.

Back to the Tribe

Invasive Sushi from Invasive Species

Chef Bun Lai of Miya’s Sushi in New Haven, Connecticut, has a cheeky solution to invasive species: he eats them. His menu regularly features lionfish and Asian shore crabs, neither of which are native to the East coast of the US. Lai’s not afraid to get his hands dirty either: watch him go snorkeling for invasive seaweed and turn it into tasty soup here. According to Lai, these seaweeds “are much more nutritious than any farmed animal flora or fauna than you could possibly buy”.

Via Eater.


Did Monogamy Make Us Human?

Want to justify the amount of time you spend on your online dating profile? It turns out that monogamy (along with language, booze, cooking, and bipedalism) may be one of those unique traits that “made us human”. While primates as a whole are an unusually monogamous for mammals, our closest relatives, the great apes, are all into promiscuous free-love. Though the benefits of the human pair bond are obvious now – it’s helpful for rearing big-brained, energy-intensive offspring – scientists are still split on why human monogamy evolved in the first place.

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600x400_1365604615_313370-facedoek 2
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Face ‘doek’

This Face ‘doek’ (Dutch for blanket) was designed by eighteen year old Noortje van Steenis and put in the corridor of her high school as a protest against the addiction of her fellow students to Facebook. She doesn’t have a Facebook account herself. The Facedoek functions like an old fashioned announcement space. Everyone is allowed to write on it. Peculiar image of the week. Picture by Marcel van den Berg.

State of scarcity
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Can This Virtual World Save the Real One?

Dutch illustrator Max Philippi has invented an online world that may help to save the real one. State of Scarcity explores interesting ideas and inventions, in part inspired by Buckminster Fuller, which Philippi hopes will serve as models for real life applications.

Opening the interactive application we enter Wrighton, a fictitious town set in a not-so-distant future, and based on concepts like reuse, recycling and de-cultivation. In this society people do everything “right” in a social and ecological sense by combining old and new nature. Philippi explains how:  Read more

Back to the Tribe

Get Your One Way Ticket to Mars

What to do when earth is not enough? Thousands of people, tired of their life on Earth, are ready to emigrate to Mars. Since subscriptions opened on April 22, 80,000 people have submitted applications to the Dutch nonprofit Mars One, hoping to become settlers of the red planet.

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