Tag: Biomimicmarketing

Image via breakingcopy.com

How Much is a Polar Bear Worth?

About $420,000, if you ask Canada. According to a report commissioned by the Canadian government, its citizens would be willing to pay $6.3 billion dollars per year to ensure that the white creatures continue to wander their vast arctic home. That’s about $500 per household, and with around 15,000 polar bears in Canada today, it equates to about $420,000 per bear. Look at the numbers a little closer, though, and you may notice that the direct benefits associated with the bears (mostly tourism and hunting) add up to a statistically insignificant $9 million per year, meaning that nearly all of the value of polar bears (at least to Canada) is qualitative, or something along the lines of “we just like them.” But why?

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plasticized human lungs

Chrysler Looks to Human Lungs for a Better Gas Tank

Compressed Natural Gas  (CNG) has one major benefit over traditional gasoline – it’s cheap. About 1/3 of the cost, to be exact. Unfortunately, it also has to be kept under very high pressure, which means that traditional gas tanks simply can’t stand up to it. Until now, the only way to store CNG fuel has been in reinforced plain geometric cylinders. Used for their strength, they also take up valuable space and weigh quite a lot. Chrysler is trying to find a better way, using human lungs as inspiration. Enrico Pisino, Chrysler’s senior manager of innovation, explains that human lungs store oxygen in numerous small sacs called alveoli, and that his researchers are using this method to design new, stronger storage tanks.

Story via Ciprian Florea at Autoevolution.com. Image via The Courier.

Nature is here to stay

Anthropo-scene #4: Longing for Nature

Nature, anybody? Heidelberger Platz is one of the more brutal urban spaces in Berlin. It is torn apart by the city highway and train lines. The few buildings that surround it look pretty ugly. There’s no feeling of a social fabric here, just a constant flow of people moving through. The whole experience of being here is pretty filthy. Except for the animals. Here they are, a dolphin and a turtle swimming in bright blue water, a happy chick and a healthy-looking ice bear, plastered on the walls of a drive-thru car wash under the highway bridge. The owners of the car wash could show race cars here or pictures of sexy women, but no: people get to see a pictorial zoo. An optimistic reading of this bizarre sight is that it exploits an in-built human longing for being in and with nature. If we feel happy hanging out with dolphins even in our car washes, humans will surely look after the well-being of Earth in the Anthropocene? The pessimistic reading goes like this: we’re fed Orwellian images of an abstract natural purity so we get distracted from how ugly human-made spaces can be. Either way, Nature is here to stay.


Organic Coke Arrives

Five years ago we presented a speculative product called Organic Coke to stir a discussion on the use of natural imagery to market products. Last year we reported on an internal presentation of the Coca-Cola company that analyzed the opportunities of Organic Coke. Guess what? This month the soda-giant launches healthier and eco-friendlier option to consumers. They call it: Cola Life.

Coca-Cola Life’ is said to be an all-natural, low-calorie soda packaged in a fully-recyclable plant-based bottle. The drink is made with a mixture of sugar and stevia-based substitute, and contains two times fewer calories than regular Coke. The all organic sugar drink is launched in Argentina, with total world domination soon to follow. The website is a schoolbook parody of biomimic marketing, except that it is not a parody.

Organic Coke: Camouflage color in the Grass.
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Madidi titi

The Monkey Named After a Website

You’re looking at the madidi titi, also know as the Goldenpalace.com titi – the first species whose name is also an ad. Discovered in 2004, the honor of naming this new monkey was auctioned off  to raise funds for the national park it calls home. Since its christening as Callicebus aureipalatii, however, there’s no evidence that the titi enjoys online gambling any more than it used it.

Image via Nova Taxa.


Eco-Friendly Filter Sprouts Flowers

These 100% biodegradable cigarette filters, called Greenbutts, deteriorate in one month rather than the typical 15 years. They are made from a natural blend of materials, including flax, hemp and cotton.

The company even designed a version with seeds inside, which sprout flowers when planted in soil, making for a very next natural way of gardening. Will this eco-friendly filter help the environment or just encourage littering? We’ll discover it soon: Greenbutts will be on sale in early 2014.


How to Grow a Beer Bottle

Over the years we have seen quite a few growing bottles, ranging from the classic Orangina bottle, to a bottle you can peel like a piece of fruit, to growing Heinz ketchup bottles. Yet, arguably, this growing beer bottle is the weirdest we have seen so far.

Apparently the biomimic-marketeers wanted to promote an all natural beer, so they envisioned a futuristic scenario in which beer bottles grow straight from the hop plants. Although any sufficiently technology will be indistinguishable from nature, we doubt that we will still drink beer from bottles by the time we are capable of such advanced guided growth. It is interesting, still, that a so-called natural beer is now marketed by portraying an utterly technological process.

Thanks to Alice for the heads-up.

Paleo fitness
Back to the Tribe

Work Out Like the Flintstones

The exercise of the future? Paleolithic fitness! From hanging from a tree branch like Tarzan, throwing and catching cobblestones to barefoot climbing, working out like our ancestors is the latest American trend. The new/old caveman fitness craze is quickly surpassing other exercise programs in popularity.

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Modern Fata Morgana

Imagine bumping into a cola dispenser after a hike in the pristine Canadian forests for three days. Would you believe your eyes? Must be a modern Fata Morgana.

It happened to Dennis van Tilburg, who sent us this peculiar image of the week. The biomimic-marketing on the can dispenser only adds peculiar points to the scene. We are living in postcard nature.