Tag: Biomimicmarketing

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Modern African Classics

Fabrics are in the heart of many African cultures. The patterns on their rich decorated fabrics represent a certain mind-set, emotion or philosophy.
As a result of our growing technosphere, the classical patterns used for generations have been redefined by the Dutch textile manufacturer Vlisco.

Patterns traditionally decorated with numbers, mathematics and letters of the alphabet were worn by people to point out the fact that they have a proper education and know how to read and write. It can also represent the importance of giving a good education to their children, saving money to realize this purpose.

Vlisco came up with an updated version of this pattern: a laptop showing this classic education related print on his screen. Suggesting that knowledge nowadays relates to our technosphere.

More to be found on: Department of History University of California, Berkeley Professor Abena Dove Osseo-Asare


Razorius Gilletus Gold Plastic

Regular readers of this blog know we are closely monitoring razor technology as a symbol of our co-evolutionary relationship with technology. This basically means that, like the bees and the flowers, people and technology are caught in a relationship of mutual dependence: we serve our technology as much as it serves us. And just like humans, technology wants to prosper, propagate and grow.

The latest species in the Razorius line is the Razorius Gilletus Gold Plastic. Like the exorbitant feathers of the peacock, which only function is to aesthetically stand out amid its competitors, this new species of Razorius Gilletus only differs from its predecessor with a thin layer of gold paint on its plastic body.

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Updated Next Nature Spotter

Enough bird spotting? Put on your nextnature glasses and start spotting with the updated Next Nature Spotter app for iPhone.

Join us in spotting Next Nature phenomena around the World. Download the free Next Nature Spotter app for iPhone in the iTunes store, and start recording examples of next natural phenomena from your everyday life. Explore the grocery store, the freeway, even your own home in a new light.

The Spotter lets you share and comment on other next nature examples in your neighborhood. It also features a handy blog reader function.

The best spotter is awarded with a free copy of the Next Nature book, and the winning entry will be published on our blog. Better get snapping, though – the last day to submit entries for this round is March 31th.


Pepsi Aubergine

Occasionally you bump into an image that seems related to our next nature quest, but you are unable to verbalize. If you have an idea, please enlighten us dear intelligent readers. For now it is our peculiar image of the week. Thanks Selby.

Image via breakingcopy.com

How Much is a Polar Bear Worth?

About $420,000, if you ask Canada. According to a report commissioned by the Canadian government, its citizens would be willing to pay $6.3 billion dollars per year to ensure that the white creatures continue to wander their vast arctic home. That’s about $500 per household, and with around 15,000 polar bears in Canada today, it equates to about $420,000 per bear. Look at the numbers a little closer, though, and you may notice that the direct benefits associated with the bears (mostly tourism and hunting) add up to a statistically insignificant $9 million per year, meaning that nearly all of the value of polar bears (at least to Canada) is qualitative, or something along the lines of “we just like them.” But why?

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plasticized human lungs

Chrysler Looks to Human Lungs for a Better Gas Tank

Compressed Natural Gas  (CNG) has one major benefit over traditional gasoline – it’s cheap. About 1/3 of the cost, to be exact. Unfortunately, it also has to be kept under very high pressure, which means that traditional gas tanks simply can’t stand up to it. Until now, the only way to store CNG fuel has been in reinforced plain geometric cylinders. Used for their strength, they also take up valuable space and weigh quite a lot. Chrysler is trying to find a better way, using human lungs as inspiration. Enrico Pisino, Chrysler’s senior manager of innovation, explains that human lungs store oxygen in numerous small sacs called alveoli, and that his researchers are using this method to design new, stronger storage tanks.

Story via Ciprian Florea at Autoevolution.com. Image via The Courier.

Nature is here to stay

Anthropo-scene #4: Longing for Nature

Nature, anybody? Heidelberger Platz is one of the more brutal urban spaces in Berlin. It is torn apart by the city highway and train lines. The few buildings that surround it look pretty ugly. There’s no feeling of a social fabric here, just a constant flow of people moving through. The whole experience of being here is pretty filthy. Except for the animals. Here they are, a dolphin and a turtle swimming in bright blue water, a happy chick and a healthy-looking ice bear, plastered on the walls of a drive-thru car wash under the highway bridge. The owners of the car wash could show race cars here or pictures of sexy women, but no: people get to see a pictorial zoo. An optimistic reading of this bizarre sight is that it exploits an in-built human longing for being in and with nature. If we feel happy hanging out with dolphins even in our car washes, humans will surely look after the well-being of Earth in the Anthropocene? The pessimistic reading goes like this: we’re fed Orwellian images of an abstract natural purity so we get distracted from how ugly human-made spaces can be. Either way, Nature is here to stay.


Organic Coke Arrives

Five years ago we presented a speculative product called Organic Coke to stir a discussion on the use of natural imagery to market products. Last year we reported on an internal presentation of the Coca-Cola company that analyzed the opportunities of Organic Coke. Guess what? This month the soda-giant launches healthier and eco-friendlier option to consumers. They call it: Cola Life.

Coca-Cola Life’ is said to be an all-natural, low-calorie soda packaged in a fully-recyclable plant-based bottle. The drink is made with a mixture of sugar and stevia-based substitute, and contains two times fewer calories than regular Coke. The all organic sugar drink is launched in Argentina, with total world domination soon to follow. The website is a schoolbook parody of biomimic marketing, except that it is not a parody.

Organic Coke: Camouflage color in the Grass.
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Madidi titi

The Monkey Named After a Website

You’re looking at the madidi titi, also know as the Goldenpalace.com titi – the first species whose name is also an ad. Discovered in 2004, the honor of naming this new monkey was auctioned off  to raise funds for the national park it calls home. Since its christening as Callicebus aureipalatii, however, there’s no evidence that the titi enjoys online gambling any more than it used it.

Image via Nova Taxa.