Tag: Biomimicry

pop-smartflower energy supply
Fake Nature

Smartflower Solar Device

Finally a fake flower with a purpose! POP the Smartflower is an all-in-one solar energy system that harvests sunlight but also stores it. It looks like a giant sunflower with solar panels petals, it interestingly behaves like one as well. Not that it turns yellow once in bloom, but it follows the sun around all day long.

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Guided Growth

Grow Your Own Bio Bot

Today on the menu, the recipe for your very own biological soft bot! Always wanted a army of self walking skeletons? Have a look at the how to step by step guide by Rashid Bashir’s research group. What sounds like a DIY kit for some free time fun is supposed to help scientists around the world to find answers to questions on the future of health and environment. Manufacturing technologies, such as 3D printing, in combination with developed biological (living) materials, have the ability to improve the construction of complicated 3D structures, taking the next step in the search of enhanced life.

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Borealis project by Dan Acher
Fake Nature

Artificial Northern Lights

Swiss artist Dan Acher‘s new project “Borealis” offers a possibility to experience the extraordinary beauty of the Northern Lights anywhere in the world. High-powered lasers project blue and green beams on the night sky to mimic the natural phenomenon. Due to variations in cloud density and changing weather conditions, the outcome is always different and unpredictable.

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Manufactured Animals

A Taste of RoboBee Honey

Bees are dying at an alarming rate, with radical consequences for humans too since these insects are essential to our food production. Without bees pollinating flowers, we could not have strawberries, peppers and apples on the supermarket shelves. While most scientists are focusing on keeping bees alive, Wyss Institute researchers at Harvard are developing a replacement for bees: RoboBees.

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Water Bear Withstands X Ray Radiation
Hypernature

This Indestructible Micro-Animal Will Help Us

He can withstand enormous heat (up to 100°C) and cold (around minus 240°C), high pressure (7.5GPa), immersion in organic solvent, frozen vacuum of space and radiation. And he’s not just an imaginary superhero. Meet Ramazzottius Varieornatus from phylum Tardigrades, commonly known as water bear. This tiny yet powerful invertebrate may help humans to conquer the space.

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members
thought collider, Mike Thompson and Susana Camara Leret
Next Nature

Interview: Mike Thompson and Susana Cámara Leret, Designers Exploring Alternative Ways of Thinking & Doing

Their work is rooted in design, has a flavor of art and a profound touch of science. It’s a blend of different types of knowledge that brings forth new knowledge. Central to their approach is an open-ended and all-inclusive mindset. Western science is as legitimate as indigenous traditions. In their opinion all knowledge is complementary. Their work ranges from the absurd to the scientific, from the experimental to the groundbreaking. Mike Thompson and Susana Cámara Leret are the minds behind Thought Collider, an experimental, critical art-design research practice based in Amsterdam.

Often their materials of choice are both everyday and completely out of the ordinary. In their project Aqua Vita they used urine as a source of information. With Fatberg, an on-going collaboration between Mike and Arne Hendriks, they are building an island of fat, which should one day roam the oceans. And their latest project: The Institute for the Design of Tropical Disease attempts to create a space where other types of discussion related to tropical disease can take place – discussions that are more imaginative than dogmatic.

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members
Fellow Day, about the next nature project Next Senses
Augmented Bodies

Fellow Day 2016: Next Senses

If you could have another sense, which sense would you choose? Would you like to have the ability to sense electromagnetic fluctuations like sharks do? Would you prefer to hear the urban soundscape of WiFi signals? Or would you like an extra organ that regulates the usage and sensitivity of the senses you already have? Recently our NNN fellows, people from different disciplines working in and around the next nature theme, came together to explore the uncharted territory of a new project: Next Senses. How do we want to perceive the world? The world we live in has changed drastically over the ages, but our everyday means of perceiving it remained the same. Isn’t it time to reevaluate the way we access to the outer world?

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synthetic canine to save dog lives
Manufactured Animals

The “Dog” That Will Save Lives

A very realist and graphic synthetic dog is currently being developed by scientists for medical training and practice for veterinarians. This weird-looking dog will be used as a replacement for terminal surgery, where actual animals, mainly from kennels, are anesthetized, used for practicing different operations, from neutering to brain surgery, and finally euthanized.

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