Tag: Biomimicry

harvard 4D printer botanic
Hypernature

4D Printing Inspired by Nature

Scientists at Harvard University have developed a method to shape-shift 4D-printed structures that could one day help heal wounds and be used in robotic surgical tools. To reach this point they mimicked the behavior of orchids, calla lilies and other flowers, especially how they bend and twist.

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bigstockphoto_Horntail_Wasp_Urocerus_Gigas__6207608
Hypernature

Wasps Inspire Robotic Needle for Surgery

Once again, scientists and developers are taking their cue from nature in order to approach innovation and effective new insights. In this example of biomimicry, it is the Wood-Boring Wasp, also known as the Horntail, that serves as inspiration for a new robotic needle which will be used in brain surgery.

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refugees
Suburban Utopia

Could Biomimicry Help us Solve the Refugee Crisis?

Millions of people are, in this very moment, in the midst of one of the biggest refugee crisis of the last several decades. The war in Syria and the unstable situation in the middle East is forcing masses of people into Europe, at a pace and scale that is causing incredible strife. Europe’s ability to absorb an ever growing number of refugees (some data points to 1.5 million people in Germany alone) is put into question both by logistical issues – can these people be taken care of in a proper, humane way? As well as by ideological and political matters – do European nations have the obligation to deal with this problem by themselves? What does this entail?

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Intimate Technology

Caress of the Gaze

If technology transformed animals into people; is technology perhaps also capable of changing people back into animals? Architect and interaction designer Behnaz Farahi envisions an interactive 3D printed outfit that can detect and respond to the gaze of the other, and respond accordingly with life-like behavior. Rest assure, we are the primitives of a next nature.

Thanks Sanne.

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wireless_mouse
Manufactured Animals

Wireless Controlled Mouse, the Animal!

Stanford engineers developed an implantable device to stimulate nerves in mice. It’s a internal remote-controlled LED chip that can make a mouse walk in circles, by using light to activate motor neurons in the animal’s brain, or peripheral nerves throughout its body. The technology is powered wirelessly using the mouse’s own body to transfer energy.

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