Tag: Bionics

wireless_mouse
Manufactured Animals

Wireless Controlled Mouse, the Animal!

Stanford engineers developed an implantable device to stimulate nerves in mice. It’s a internal remote-controlled LED chip that can make a mouse walk in circles, by using light to activate motor neurons in the animal’s brain, or peripheral nerves throughout its body. The technology is powered wirelessly using the mouse’s own body to transfer energy.

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Augmented-Bodies

Hacking Human Cells to Use Solar Power

Our cells are not that different from a car engine: they depend on carbon-based fuels for energy. But using carbon for energy is an inefficient process. This is what the biotech startup BiPlastiq seeks to resolve, using solar energy instead of carbon and oxygen, by hacking our cells.

The founder of BiPlastiq, Christopher Powell believes that by hacking our mitochondrial structures to use solar energy, the power output of our bodies might increase dramatically. This upgrade could arguably transform human bodies into regenerative machines and extend human lives by decades.

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yangyang
Anthropomorphobia

Meet Yangyang, Actroid From China

Dressed in a full-length read coat, the humanoid robot Yangyang can function autonomously, talking and gesturing while interacting with people. Thanks to a number of tiny motors beneath her rubbery skin, she can display a wide range of facial expressions, move the head and raise the hands as a sign of greeting.

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TOP UAV
Bionics

Drone Operated by Honeybee Brain

The Green Brain Project aims to create drones that will think, act and sense like a bee. In order to do this, the team of researchers from the University of Sheffield and University of Sussex in England is now working on recreating the brain structure of the European honeybee Apis mellifera. 

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Nanoneedles
Augmented-Bodies

Organs Could Self-Heal with Nanoneedles

Medical practices of the future could become much more efficient with the help of nanotechnology. During a recent experiment, an international team of scientists used nano-sized needles in order to promote production of new blood cells. If successful, this technology could be applied to the human body to repair damaged organs and nerves.

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cyborgroach
Bionics

Turning Cockroaches into Rescue Robots

Certain natural disasters such as earthquakes and Tsunamis often trap high numbers of people under unstable rubble, making search-and-rescue operations very difficult. Cyborg cockroaches might be of critical help for these disasters.

North Caroline State University carried out a study in 2012, where researchers attached electrodes to the antennae of Madagascar hissing cockroaches to steer them. Currently, the team is working on tiny backpacks attached to the back of cockroaches, to transform these critters into moving networks of sensors.

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Biomimicmarketing

Biomimicry in Action

An inspiring topic about recent developments in biomimicry, Janine Benyus gave a talk on how nature influenced our future.

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Shrilkwing.tif
Bionics

Using Shrimp Shell to Produce Bioplastics

Bugs are one of the most frequently imitated living species in science. Even the word “bug” is borrowed to describe software or hardware defects, spying devices or cult automobiles, such as the Volkswagen Beetle. The latest mimicry of these fascinating creatures has been developed by Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard. Researchers Javier Fernandez and Donald Ingber are inspired by the exoskeletons of bugs in order to produce sturdy, biodegradable plastics.

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glowingplanet
Bionics

Cities Evolve in Similar Ways as Galaxies

Satellite images of Earth at night evoke ambiguous feelings: While on a ground level our cities appear as purely cultural artifacts, a traveler from outer space might just as well marvel at them as beautifully glowing organic fungi-like structures that sprouted on our planet. Less than a millennium ago, the Earth at night was all dark. Today it is all glowing and blossoming.

Scientists think the laws governing the structure of galaxies in outer space are the same laws underlying the growth of cities. Henry Lin and Abraham Loeb at the Harvard-Smithsonian Centre for Astrophysics have used models for showing how galaxies evolve based on matter density to propose a unifying theory for scaling laws of human populations.

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