Tag: Boomeranged Metaphors

Boomeranged Metaphors

The Virtual Makes an Entrance into Reality

Here is another example of how virtual experiences from the digital realm are gradually seeping into our physical environment. The mobile phone unlocking tool has now boomeranged into the real world, in the form of a doormat. Unfortunately it doesn’t really unlock the door, yet!

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image from dailymail.co.uk
Boomeranged Metaphors

Internet Archeologists Reconstruct Vanishing Digital Artifacts

Where civilizations of the past left drawings, glyphs and written messages, we have taken to the internet to record the vast majority of modern history and knowledge. But is it permanent? At Old Dominion University in Virginia, researchers Hany Salah Eldeen and Michael Nelson have been studying the rate at which information on the internet disappears, and if it can be restored.

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Boomeranged Metaphors

Virtual Offline Shopping

Remember those good old days days when you were actually carrying goods out of the racks in a shop? If the Korean Virtual Shopping Store becomes a success, all shop shelves will soon be LCD Screens.

Customers simply choose their desired items by touching the LCD screen and checkout at the counter in the end to have all their ordered stuff packed in bags. Image consumption in the overdrive. Thanks Arnoud.

Boomeranged Metaphors

Digital Sharing Becomes Physical

Our urge to share everything – photos, food, video games scores – is blurring the line between reality and digital life. Looking at the human history of sharing experiences, it’s highly likely that this line will totally disappear in the near future.

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Roulette for Your Facebook Account

Remember the Web 2.0 Suicide Machine? That was for those who where fed up with only speaking with their families online, liking their own holiday pictures and spending warm summer days compulsively checking status updates from better, cooler, more successful friends. It’s now three years on, and social media have become an even more inescapable part of our everyday routine. If you’re still in doubt about whether or not to end your Facebook life, there’s now the game of Social Roulette. According to co-founder Kyle McDonald:

“Social Roulette has a 1 in 6 chance of deleting your account, and a 5 in 6 chance that it just posts “I played Social Roulette and survived” to your timeline. […] Everyone thinks about deleting their account at some point, it’s a completely normal reaction to the overwhelming nature of digital culture. Is it time to consider a new development in your life? Are you looking for the opportunity to start fresh? Or are you just seeking cheap thrills at the expense of your social network? Maybe it’s time for you to play Social Roulette.”

I’m waiting for the 21st century version of the Deer Hunter.

Boomeranged Metaphors

Google Birdhouse Shows Birds Their Way

Maybe the Taiwanese artist Shuchun Hsiao was inspired by a cold winter day to reinvent the common birdhouse in the shape of the Google Maps icon. The designer understood the importance and the omnipresence of Google Maps in our society and created the Google Birdhouse Project, a modern way to accommodate birds in urban spaces.

The iconic symbol references the “surfing” of flying birds to find their arrival point, just like Google Maps does for humans. As Shuchun Hsiao explains: “Birds have the most real experience of Google Maps. Birds can fly through the city, through streets. A birdhouse becomes their destination”.

Eye-catching, but not intrusive, these niches are also interesting urban decorations. The micro in the macro, the abstract becoming material, the virtual in the real: the result of the Google Birdhouse is bewildering and strong. Perhaps something dealing with Twitter would have been more predictable.

“Second Life” (2007); Phnom Penh, Cambodia
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Out of Network

When we type “Flickr” or “Facebook” or “YouTube” into a browser, we seek to enter social networks and enjoy secure communication and interaction with a vast number of online users from around the world. Most of us take for granted that these words are understood by others in the same way. But what if rather than type these words on a keyboard we paint them on the walls of slums in Mali, Cambodia or Vietnam. Their meanings would certainly change.

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