Tag: Calm-technology


Visualizing Wifi Landscapes

This project explores the invisible terrain of WiFi networks in urban spaces by light painting signal strength in long-exposure photographs. A four-metre long measuring rod with 80 points of light reveals cross-sections through WiFi networks using a photographic technique called light-painting.

More info on: nearfield.org – via the #CoCities conference


Fly Paper Clock

Bionic horror by designers James Auger and Jimmy Loizeau, who have created a clock that traps insects on flypaper before depositing them into a vat of bacteria. The resulting chemical reaction – a form of digestion – results into electric power that keeps the roller rolling and the clock ticking.

At first sight the Fly Paper Clock seems odious and prosperous, however, we must applaud its self-sustaining quality. Will we one day have our houses crowded of insect catching domestic robots? NPR has an article on more meat eating furniture, including a table that consumes mice.

Thanks Roy van den Heuvel.


The Footsticker

There are many advantages of bare feet sporting: better motion control, more feeling in your feet and direct floor contact, etc. In this way you are more grounded and more aware of your feet and movements. Its also a good training for stronger feet. But a disadvantage is the risk of injuries, you can easily twist or slip.

The footsticker improves the activity and keeps the bare foot feeling!  The flexible material feels like a second skin. This footsticker gives you more grip, support and protection. It was an independent graduation project at Nike EMEA by Frieke Severs.

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Acoustic Botany

With his speculative ‘acoustic garden’ David Benqué tries to explore our cultural and aesthetic relationship to nature. He states that the current debate around Genetic Engineering is centred around subjects like food and healthcare but that the altering of nature is no new development. Mankind altered nature for hundreds of years. Think of flowers and mind altering weeds. Benqué wants to question the role of our aesthetic relationship to nature in this age of synthetic biology.

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Squamata headset dances with the Music

Inspired by body language of animals (in particular squamates and porcupines), designer Jop Japenga created a headphone with an adaptive skin that responds to the music played on them – resembling a bird performing a mating dance.

The concept of his headphone was to make an public depiction of one’s frame of mind rather than a set of headphones that just reacted to the hits of every song. Inner atmosphere is communicated through a skin of reflective scales. Japenga used memory metal, an Arduino controller and custom electronic to create a working prototype with kinetic scales on the band that wave with either energetic or subtle force in accordance with the genre of music.

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BMW’s Flexible Skin Concept GINA

This extraordinary concept model that came out of the batcave of BMW shows how textile might be the future of car design. By replacing metal bodywork with a strong but flexible skin the Beamer they call GINA can transform on the spot to suit your mood. Things like opening the bonnet or adjusting your headlights suddenly become something fluid and natural.

For the future it holds the promise that a car will adapt to you and your current needs. Do you have a party and need a sleek saloon or did you just do your groceries and need some more room in the trunk? With a flexible skin this is all possible within one vehicle.

intimacy dress
Intimate Technology

Intimacy Dress

The Intimacy dress takes our notion personal space to a next level: the closer someone approaches, the more transparent the dress becomes. As such, the garment becomes a sort of second skin that allows the body to become an ‘interface’. As the interaction is similar to known interfacial body functions like blushing, one can anticipate the interaction to function on an intuitive level.

The dress is comprised of a flexible e-foil, which becomes transparent when slightly powered. The project is being developed by Studio Roosegaarde in collaboration with V2 as an exploration of the relationship between intimacy and technology.


Seashells are becoming Unnecessary

At the beach, I’m always on the look-out for seashells big enough to hold against my ear to hear the sound of the sea. This child-like behavior still resonates with me. But I got really puzzled when I saw this movie on wired.co.uk.

How it it possible that I can look at an installation, created by Nils Völker using 108 plastic bags, two CPU cooling fans. MDF, relays, countless screws and an Arduino controller and all I can think of is the sea?



In Next Nature, not only old nature is being idealized. Because of the rapidness of new emerging technologies, we have a tendency to dwell on earlier prototypes. To recall memories, or to give that ‘real’ experience. We call this bittersweet longing for past technologies technostalgia. Technostalgia shapes our memories, our past and thus our present.

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