Tag: Digital-Presence

Bionics

An Adblocker for Your Eyes

Most VR concepts and products are coming from big tech companies. With their ad-driven business models they are likely to fill your Glass, Hololens or Oculus with ads at some point. What if these exact same tools are used to block ads? Build your own.

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Digital-Presence

Mark Zuckerberg Discovers ‘Books’

The Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg made a New Year’s resolution to read a book every other week, and last week he invited his 30 million Facebook followers to join him in what could become the world’s largest book club.

“I’m excited for my reading challenge. I’ve found reading books very intellectually fulfilling,” Zuckerberg said in a post. “Books allow you to fully explore a topic and immerse yourself in a deeper way than most media today.”

Hooray for Mark! And his book club is so influential that the paperback version of the first book Zuck chose to read for the group,”The End of Power” has now sold out on Amazon. Naturally we have a special book recommendation for Mark.

Anthropomorphobia

Lonely Sculpture Your Next Tinder Match?

Tinder users beware: somewhere out there on the Internet, a mechanical finger is surfing the popular dating smartphone app, endlessly approving profiles. This could be your next match.

The Lonely Sculpture, by Australian artist Tully Arnot, calls into question our increasingly digitized networks of relationships, illustrating how communicating via machine strips our interactions of personality and individuality.

As we become more and more dependent on technology, the lines between people and products are blurred.

Mideast Egypt
Digital-Presence

Web Access Is A Basic Human Right

“It’s time to recognize the Internet as a basic human right” its inventor Sir Tim Berners-Lee has said. “That means guaranteeing affordable access for all, ensuring Internet packets are delivered without commercial or political discrimination, and protecting the privacy and freedom of web users regardless of where they live”.

At the release of the 2014-15 Web Index — the world’s first measure of the Web’s contribution to social, economic and political progress — the father of the World Wide Web noted that in our increasingly unequal world, the web has the potential to be a great equalizer, but only “if we hardwire the rights to privacy, freedom of expression, affordable access and net neutrality into the rules of the game”.

As the Internet has become our main conduit of information and the filter through which we survey the world around us, is it time to add it beside freedom, justice and peace, in a next natural Universal Declaration of Human Rights?

Source: Huffpost Tech

Data_Walk
Augmented-Bodies

Listening to Wi-Fi

Modern technologies can give deaf people the ability to hear again. With hearing aid people who lost their hearing can instantly hear the lost sounds again they were missing. Frank Swain was one of these people who retrieved their hearing again, thanks to this. Not only can he hear all the regular sounds around us, but also the invisible Wi-Fi signals.

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Ruriden
Digital-Presence

High-Tech Cemetery

Japanese people use to turn to technology for solutions to many of the issues of life, and now death too.

In Japan, a crowded country with a fast-ageing society, there is a shortage of final resting places, especially in the big cities. With a population expected to shrink by nearly 30 million people over the next 50 years, the funerals and graves market is very alive. The Ruriden cemetery, in Tokyo, is a hi-tech solution – multi-storey graveyards.

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