Tag: Dynamic-architecture


Vertical Farms Growing In Giant Trees

In the forest, plants struggle with each others to gain sunlight. Meanwhile in the ‘urban jungle’ we call cities, plants need to fight against tall buildings and skyscrapers in order to reach fresh air and sun rays.

Inspired by ‘The Vertical Farm’ by Dr. Dickson Despommier, Aprilli Design Studio conceptualized Urban Skyfarm as architectural solution that brings vegetation high up in the air and environmental improvement for food production and distribution.

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Floating Underwater Self-Sufficient City

Underwater malls with transparent walls and spectacular undersea views, recreational green spaces below the surface of water, floating hotels and submarines connections, buoyant farms and vertical gardens.

Is this a dream for a human size aquarium city? No, Asian architects of AT Design Office has seriously developed a concept for a four square miles ocean metropolis!

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Robotic Furniture puts IKEA to Shame

While science fiction taught us to think of robots as human-like beings, the ones that actually make it into your home will more likely look like furniture. A team at the EPFL Biorobotics Laboratory in Switzerland is developing multipurpose robotic building blocks, called Roombots, that put your regular furniture to shame.

The robotic furniture can self-assemble into a chair and move across the room with you in it, and reassemble into a table that delivers you a glass of water. The researchers created a video that shows them in action.

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Back to the Tribe

Weaving a Home

Inspired by temporary huts of nomadic tribes, designer Abeer Seikaly created a disaster shelter for refugees using patterned fabric. The project, called Weaving a Home, is based on ancient traditions of intertwining fibers and materials to make complex three-dimensional shapes for functional and social needs.

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From Infoniac.com

3D Print a New House in One Day

3D printing technology is become more accessible, more affordable, and more useful every day. From factory tooling to movie props, 3D has countless applications – and now, you can even print your own house! In this TED talk, University of Southern California professor Behrokh Khoshnevis talks about scaling up the processes already used in rapid prototyping technology, and working with a 3D printer that can print the structure of a 250 square meter house using concrete.

A major limitation of the technology is that it only prints on a single level. Enrico Dini’s British company D-shape hopes to expand on the possibilities of large-scale 3D printing, and has managed to print a two-level structure, but not a livable home yet. It raises the question of which direction this technology is headed – in the future, will we print taller, leading to constructive new methods of city-building, or will we print wider, increasing the already-rapid pace of suburban sprawl? And if it does lead to sprawl, who will print roads and sewer lines to serve the houses?

bird nest in new york

Living Among Pests – Designing the Biosynthetic City

Biosynthetic design is usually discussed at the scale of the individual product. But the city – itself a mixture of synthetic interventions within biological systems – can be considered a more complex piece of biosynthetic design. Conversations in urban planning have moved away from blunt engineering and the evisceration of species to serve human convenience, towards balanced management and co-existence. Joyce Hwang discusses the challenges for designers, and gains for citizens, of living in a truly biosynthetic city. 

This essay originally appeared in Volume magazine #35. Get your copy here

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New York Preps for Climate Change by Building New Wetlands

A lot of planners give lip service to preparing for higher seas, stronger storms, and hotter summers, but in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, New York is putting its money where its mouth is. The city is considering creating new land in the East River, or constructing Dutch-style floodgates to hold back storms. From a next nature perspective, however, the most interesting proposal is the East River Blueway.

In an effort that restores some of the primeval feel of what was once the lush island of Mannahatta, the Blueway aims to create a series of wetlands and beaches that would absorb the tidal surges from future hurricanes. Lest this sound like another utopian vision, the city has already raised $8 million to revitalize a 4-mile stretch on Manhattan’s east side, and plans to grow a similar “soft edge” at Coney Island. Now that New York no longer needs its waterfront for industry or shipping, it might be time to let (artificial) nature return.

Story via Gizmodo. Picture via Inhabitat.