Tag: Fake-nature

Fake Nature

Birthmarks Tattoo

As the name suggests, Birthmarks Tattoos, are fake – but permanent – birthmarks that you can add to your body. Aside from its decorative potential, Birthmarks Tattoo makes it possible for you and your partner to “exchange” birthmarks or to imprint your body with a secret message in braille. Birthmarks Tattoo is a concept by Dutch designers Julia Müller, Arjan Groot and Menno Wittebrood who were commissioned by the magazine Identity Matters to come up with an idea for new ways of tattooing.

Via Guerrila Innovation | See also: Barcode Tattoos | Electronic Tattoos

Nintendo DS used for sexy fun

Nintendo Portables Are Breeding Grounds For Sexy Fun

Sexuality and sensuality are phenomena which have been a nature for us as long as we humans exist. Not only humans experience these phenomena; also animals experience sexuality and, more or less, sensuality.

One of the things which make humans distinct from other animals when it comes to sex, is that humans make use of artificial artifacts to stimulate sexual feelings. Have you ever seen a lion which needed a vibrator to make things better?

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Google landscape

Microbic Landscapes

Beautiful Google Maps shots of housing projects in southwest Florida. Probably designed to look and feel more natural than your average straight street neighborhood, they remind me of microbes under a microscope.
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No lines on the horizon

A Clear Sky

Remember the beginning of 2010, when the Eyjafjallajokull volcano erupted, throwing huge amounts of ash into the air, thousands of flights have been canceled across Europe due to fears that ash could turn into molten glass within a hot jet engine, crippling the aircraft. This picture was taken during and after the flight ban at the same location. Via


Becoming female

A shot of a male body after a sex change by dutch artist and photographer Martin C. de Waal. De Waal tries to make people rethink their opinions by pushing the boundaries of self-alteration. With a fascination for plastic surgery and a strong drive to reinvent himself he underwent an eight and a half hour surgery to alter his face a few years ago. – mcdewaal.com


Nomadic Plants

Nomadic Plants are a species assembled from a group of robotic-electronic-biological organisms living in symbiosis in order to survive in habitats affected by human activity.

The nomadic plant automatically moves towards water when its bacteria require nourishment. It contains vegetation and microorganisms living symbiotically inside the body of the apparatus. The robot draws water from a contaminated river, decomposes its elements, helps to create energy to feed its brain circuits, and the surplus is then used to create life, maintaining plants that, at once, complete their own life cycle.

Gilberto Esparza created these Nomadic Plants as a metaphor for the supposed alienation of the human condition and the impact its activity has on its environment. By creating these plants nomadic plants, which obviously haven’t evolved by themselves, its creator hopes to instigate critical reflections on the ambiguity of the force wielded by technology.

Seen at HAIP Festival – New Nature.


Newspaper Wood

How to upcycle old newspapers? Mieke Meijer (a.o.) from Vij5 took a jar of glue and started imitating tree rings. “The product surprisingly mimics the quality of real wood” she states. Read more


Palmtree Drilling Platform

In our ‘under the beach lies the pavement’ series. Already in 1973, Steven M. Johnson drew cartoons of oil drilling platforms disguised to look like palm trees, in an attempt by oil companies to persuade the public they would bring no harm to the environment.

Now this cartoons show us three things: 1) How we like to recreate our environment according to our image of nature. 2) How truly sophisticated technology becomes invisible, as it fluently integrates into the fabric of our environment. 3) That oil drilling technology isn’t very sophisticated.

Luckily the palmtree drilling platform is just a cartoon, just like these hilarious cell phone antenna trees… no wait, they are real.

Via Neatorama, Thanks Ton.


Adaptive Bloom

This interactive installation came out of the Postgraduate Certificate Course in Advanced Architectural Research of the Bartlett School of Architecture in London. Graduate Justin Goodyer created this responsive wall that originally was designed to be a décor as well as a performing artist in a dance performance. The wall would react to the dancers by letting its flowers bloom whenever they sense someone is near. Thus creating an interaction between performers and their surroundings.

In the video you can see the wall reacting on the public at the ‘Constructing Realities’ exposition that shows the best project of the postgraduate course.