Tag: Food Technology

password screen on iphone
Augmented-Bodies

Swallow a Pill to Turn Your Body into a Living Password

More and more pieces of our daily lives are becoming password-protected. In a 2007 study, Microsoft found the average person to have 6.5 unique passwords, while by 2011, Skrill found this number to be over 10. Meanwhile, human short-term memory is only designed to remember seven unconnected pieces of information, and this number is not going up. In the face of increasingly complex rules for creating impenetrable passwords, some platforms have switched to identification via fingerprints or other intrinsic information. However, even fingerprints can be stolen. So what if your body was the password?

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Design-for-debate

Jellyfish Ice Cream Glows When Licked

Next Nature Network is not the only group to experiment with futuristic ice creamCharlie Harry Francis, the food inventor behind the company Lick Me I’m Delicious, combined two completely different elements: ice cream and jellyfish. The result is the ice cream that glows in the dark.

Francis collaborated with a scientist from China who created a synthetic version of the bioluminescent protein from jellyfish, so no sea creatures were hurt in the making of this dessert. These calcium-activated proteins react when they are agitated – basically, they glow when the ice cream is licked. Funny but expensive: each scoop of fluorescent gelato costs around $220.

In the natural world, animals use bioluminescence to attract mates, warn predators or light up the environment. What message are humans sending by eating glowing ice-cream?

Anthropocene

How to Avoid a Global Wine Shortage

A global wine shortage is coming. Rising global consumption is contending with European wine production that has been acutely affected by changing weather patterns. Because wine consumption depends on regional grape varieties that are often climate-specific, poor harvests in Italy and France (the two largest global producers of wine, and among the largest consumers too) will lead to a global wine shortage as the 2012 vintage is released.

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Food Technology

Care for a Meat Flower Amuse?

While vegetarian food products typically mimic existing meat products, the meat flower reverses this principle: In vitro technology is used to grow meat in the shape of a flower.

The Meat Flower is illustrative for the diminishing of borders between ‘meat’ and ‘vegetarian’ due to emerging technology: although the cultured meat is grown from animal cells, no animals are hurt and injured in the process.

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Fake-for-Real

Now Your Smartphone Can Smell Like Barbecue and Buttered Potatoes

Here comes Hana Yakiniku by Scentee, the latest Smartphone gadget made ??in Japan. It is an olfactory device that spreads the aroma of barbecue through an app. All you need is to plug a small diffuser in the headphones hole and insert into it one of three different extracts: grilled veal ribs, salty tongue and butter potatoes. Using the app the user can select the sent that he wants to smell. To improve the simulation there is also a video showing the meat grilling on a barbecue.

The promotional video for the launch of Hana Yakiniku suggests some uses for the device: while eating just a bowl of rice, to help with a diet, or to save money buying meat. The idea is so absurd as to seem an ironic provocation, but maybe it’s just a future meat scenario.

Do you want to know more about the future of meat? We are writing a speculative cookbook of in-vitro meat dishes. Join us at www.bistro-invitro.com.

Diagram of the steps in making in vitro meat
Food Technology

Grossed Out by Lab-Grown Meat? Here’s 7 Reasons Why You Shouldn’t Be

Many people find the idea of eating in vitro meat – animal muscle tissue grown in a lab – to be creepy, unnatural or downright disgusting. Maybe it’s the association with medical science, or maybe it’s the fact that a happy cow in a grassy meadow seems far more friendly that something scraped from a bioreactor. It turns out, however, that in vitro meat is a lot less unnatural than we think it is, and that “normal” food is far more bizarre than it seems. Here’s the top seven reasons why you shouldn’t be grossed out by lab-grown meat:

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Food Technology

Le Bistro In Vitro @ Dutch Design Week

This whole week you can come and taste meat ice at Le Bistro In Vitro in the main hall of Eindhoven University of Technology. Curious to hear what your favorite scoop is: Meat Fruit? Dragon? Polar Bear?

Our in vitro meat visions are also still on display at the Future Food house in Rotterdam. Want to help us explore the food culture lab grown meat could brings us before we decide if we accept it? Support our in vitro meat cookbook.

Back to the Tribe

Cockroach Farms Do Big Business for Food and Pharmaceuticals

The secret ingredient in Chinese traditional medicine? Ground-up cockroach. Many farmers in China are turning to one of the world’s most reviled bugs to make big bucks. They’re cheap to feed (they live on rotting vegetables), easy to kill (dunk them in boiling water) and easy to store (dry them in the sun). Farmers are making a healthy profit selling the roaches to researchers studying whether the pulverized insects can be used to cure baldness, AIDS and cancer. They also wind up as fish food and even, sometimes, as deep-fried snacks for humans.

Read more about roach ranching at the LA Times.