Tag: Food Technology

Fake-for-Real

Now Your Smartphone Can Smell Like Barbecue and Buttered Potatoes

Here comes Hana Yakiniku by Scentee, the latest Smartphone gadget made ??in Japan. It is an olfactory device that spreads the aroma of barbecue through an app. All you need is to plug a small diffuser in the headphones hole and insert into it one of three different extracts: grilled veal ribs, salty tongue and butter potatoes. Using the app the user can select the sent that he wants to smell. To improve the simulation there is also a video showing the meat grilling on a barbecue.

The promotional video for the launch of Hana Yakiniku suggests some uses for the device: while eating just a bowl of rice, to help with a diet, or to save money buying meat. The idea is so absurd as to seem an ironic provocation, but maybe it’s just a future meat scenario.

Do you want to know more about the future of meat? We are writing a speculative cookbook of in-vitro meat dishes. Join us at www.bistro-invitro.com.

Diagram of the steps in making in vitro meat
Food Technology

Grossed Out by Lab-Grown Meat? Here’s 7 Reasons Why You Shouldn’t Be

Many people find the idea of eating in vitro meat – animal muscle tissue grown in a lab – to be creepy, unnatural or downright disgusting. Maybe it’s the association with medical science, or maybe it’s the fact that a happy cow in a grassy meadow seems far more friendly that something scraped from a bioreactor. It turns out, however, that in vitro meat is a lot less unnatural than we think it is, and that “normal” food is far more bizarre than it seems. Here’s the top seven reasons why you shouldn’t be grossed out by lab-grown meat:

Read more

Food Technology

Le Bistro In Vitro @ Dutch Design Week

This whole week you can come and taste meat ice at Le Bistro In Vitro in the main hall of Eindhoven University of Technology. Curious to hear what your favorite scoop is: Meat Fruit? Dragon? Polar Bear?

Our in vitro meat visions are also still on display at the Future Food house in Rotterdam. Want to help us explore the food culture lab grown meat could brings us before we decide if we accept it? Support our in vitro meat cookbook.

Back to the Tribe

Cockroach Farms Do Big Business for Food and Pharmaceuticals

The secret ingredient in Chinese traditional medicine? Ground-up cockroach. Many farmers in China are turning to one of the world’s most reviled bugs to make big bucks. They’re cheap to feed (they live on rotting vegetables), easy to kill (dunk them in boiling water) and easy to store (dry them in the sun). Farmers are making a healthy profit selling the roaches to researchers studying whether the pulverized insects can be used to cure baldness, AIDS and cancer. They also wind up as fish food and even, sometimes, as deep-fried snacks for humans.

Read more about roach ranching at the LA Times.

beef tree ready for the grill
Food Technology

The Woods Smell of Meat

A team of plaid-clad butchers have spotted a mature meat tree deep within the bacon-scented woods. Armed with hatchets and bone saws, the men chop the tree into logs. Back at the slaughter-mill, a quick bath in scalding water removes the tree’s dense layer of fur. Its bark is cured for leather. Its central supporting bone is cleaned and shipped out for use in construction and plumbing. The meat tree, however, is most prized for its succulent flesh. Meat tree logs can be seen rotating in the windows of many shawarma and döner kebab cafes. In the image above, a bûche de Noël has been sliced into bone-in ribeye steaks for a delicious, sustainable holiday dinner.

Image via Vancouver Fine Arts.

Food Technology

The 10th Anniversary of the World’s First Lab-Grown Steak

Amidst all the fanfare about the first in vitro hamburger, it’s easy to forget that this is not the first time that enterprising scientists have grown and eaten cultured meat. Way back in 2003, artists Oron Catts and Ionat Zurr of the Tissue Culture & Art Project spent three months growing a “semi-living” steak made from frog cells. The tiny steak was marinated in calvados and fried with garlic and honey, then served to some (un)lucky diners. The verdict on the taste and texture? “Jellied fabric”. Part of the sad state of the steak was that, unlike the recent lab-grown burger, the frog patty hadn’t been exercised over the course of its short semi-life.

Though a disembodied frog steak might seem strange, the story gets even stranger. According to the artists, “Soon after the installation, we were approached by an animal welfare organization with a request to grow semi-living human steaks—specifically, the group’s director asked for a feast based on a steak grown from her own flesh.” Perhaps history’s very first request for auto-cannibalistic in vitro meat. Maybe not its last.

If you’re interested in cannibal cuisine, you’ll want to check out our newest project, the In Vitro Meat Cookbook. Contribute to our crowdfunding campaign today!

Design-for-debate

From Fast Food Packaging to Flowerpot

“Enjoy your food. Then put the seeds from under the label with gravel to the bowl and let it grow. After a week, plant bowl with an herb to the ground. The bowl will degrade and you can grow up your own herb”. This is the challenge of Michal Marko, design student at Tomas Bata University in Zlín, Czech Republic.

Read more

vegetable lamb of tartary
Food Technology

The Sci-Fi Prehistory of “Victimless” Meat

The idea of “disembodied” meat, whether grown from trees or in the lab, has been around for at least a century – if not way longer. The medieval notion of the “vegetable lamb of Tartary”, a live sheep that sprouts from a plant, could be thought of as the great-granddaddy of “victimless” meat. However, the idea of truly in vitro meat had to wait for the invention of cell culture. No doubt French surgeon Alexis Carrell pondered taking a nibble of an immortal drumstick when he created an “immortal” chicken heart cell line in 1912.

Perhaps the earliest explicit mentions of cultured meat comes from British statesman Frederick Edwin Smith. In 1930, Smith predicted that “it will no longer be necessary to go to the extravagant length of rearing a bullock in order to eat its steak. From one ‘parent’ steak of choice tenderness it will be possible to grow as large and as juicy a steak as can be desired.” Winston Churchill famously echoed this sentiment only two years later. According to Technovelty, in vitro meat made its first appearance in fiction in 1952. Since then, sci-fi authors have described inspiring, bizarre and uncanny speculative meat futures. Click through for some of the most evocative…

Next Nature is continuing the tradition of visionary lab-grown meat speculation: Support our crowdfunding campaign for the world’s first in vitro meat cookbook!

Read more

Food Technology

Food Simulator to Fulfill the Desire to Eat

What if in the future we won’t need to shop at the supermarket and to deal with pots and stoves? According to Renata Kuramshina and Caroline Woortmann Lima, master’s students from Dessau Design Department of Anhalt University, we could just seat on a comfortable armchair and use some nasal and oral sensors to satisfy the desire to eat. This device, called Tenet, is designed to replicate the pleasure and emotions received from food and its rituals, without touching a fork or knife. Read more

Food Technology

Anti-BP Diseased Dolphin Ride

In what’s probably the most fun form of environmental protest ever, Banksy has created a morose-looking dolphin ride to protest the BP oil spill. The ride is complete with fish nets and a filthy barrel of BP crude. Go to Brighton Pier in England if you fancy a turn on the convulsing cetacean.

Via BoingBoing.