Tag: Food Technology

Food Technology

Virtual Reality Dining Experience

Ever wished to eat anything you want without worrying about calories or allergies? It could be possible thanks to augmented reality experiments.

Created by designer Jinsoo An, Project Nourished is a gastronomic virtual reality experience that uses Oculus Rift headsets, cutlery with sensors, low-calorie foods and aromatic diffusers to mimic the taste of the real, and much more caloric, thing.

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Chloe Rutzerveld
Food Technology

Interview: Chloé Rutzerveld, Designer Who Wants to Grow Healthy 3D Printed Food

The next guest in our interview series is Chloé Rutzerveld, young talented and promising Food and Concept designer, from Eindhoven University of Technology. Chloé is interested in combining aspects of food, design, nature, culture and life sciences in a form of critical design. She uses food as a medium to address, communicate and discuss social, cultural or scientific issues.

Throughout 2014, Chloé worked on a 3D food printing project, titled Edible Growth, to show how high-tech or lab-produced food doesn’t have to be unhealthy, unnatural or not tasteful. Her concept is an example of a future food product fully natural, healthy, and sustainable.

The working principle combines aspects of nature, science, technology and design: multiple layers containing seeds, spores and yeast are printed according to a personalized 3D file. Within five days the plants and fungi mature and the yeast ferments the solid inside into a liquid. Depending on the preferred intensity, the consumer decides when to harvest and eat the edible. While the project is still speculative due to technological limits, the concept is very intriguing.

We recently talked with Chloé about people’s response to Edible Growth, the profession of food designer and new preparation methods and products that could be on our plate one day. Here’s what she had to say:

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Food Technology

The Carnery – A Cultured Future with In vitro Meat

Imagine London 2025. The first in vitro carnery ‘Counter Culture’ opens its doors. The restored 1970s-era English brewpub boasts an expansive bar of reclaimed mahogany and booths upholstered with magnificent in vitro leather. Steaks are grown to precision inside giant steel vats, decorated (functionally) with illuminated green algae tanks. A disorienting mingling of global spices flavor varieties of exotic and heritage meats like boar and Berkshire, all of which are cultured on site. The large charcuterie board, consisting of mushroom-media duck foie gras, coriander mortadella and crispy lobes of sweetbread pairs perfectly with a shortlist of probiotic cocktails (try the rum and kombucha).

In vitro meat has the capacity to transform meat production as we know it, not only offering new and diverse types of product but also introducing an entirely new way of thinking about and interacting with food. One day, growing meat may seem as natural as making cheese or beer.

By ISHA DATAR and ROBERT BOLTON – From The In Vitro Meat Cookbook

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Food Technology

In Vitro Meat: Animal Liberation?

Perhaps the most uplifting promise of in vitro meat is that it will be good for animals. Animal cells are needed to make it, but only in small amounts, and if algae can be used to feed these cells, no animals need to suffer for this meat. In 2008, the animal rights organization PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) offered one million dollars to whoever could develop marketable in vitro chicken by 2012 (1).As that deadline proved to be too tight, PETA used the money to subsidize in vitro meat research. Many other people, too, welcome in vitro meat primarily because of what it may mean for animals. Even though they often find the idea strange and perhaps even a bit uncanny, the promise for animals is widely felt as a source of hope.

By COR VAN DER WEELE and CLEMENS DRIESSEN – From The In Vitro Meat Cookbook

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Food To Eat With Your Eyes

Anything can be made” claims one of the many producer of plastic food.
In Japan, fake food industry represents a century of old crafting tradition and a multi billion business.

Restaurants proudly show inviting vitrines of hyper-realistic replicas of food and drinks. Why? Japanese like to “eat with their eyes”. But what is really entertaining about it lies behind the scene, where extremely fascinating production techniques have been developed over time to create the most amazing results.

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Food Technology

Growing the Future of Meat

Biology grows. In petri dishes or bodies, cells grow and multiply, self-regulating and self-repairing. By taking advantage of the power of biological growth, a single stem cell can theoretically be nurtured to grow indefinitely. Outside of the limits imposed by the edges of an animal’s body, the cells can reproduce and multiply until they exhaust the nutrients and space provided, filling petri dishes and vats to grow the future of meat.

By CHRISTINA AGAPAKIS – From The In Vitro Meat Cookbook

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Food Technology

Veggie Burger That Bleeds Like Real Meat

Professor Mark Post has a competitor in the search for a change in the way we produce and eat meat. Stanford biochemist Patrick Brown has come up with an innovative alternative to make environmentally friendly beef burgers.
He developed the burger pictured above out of nothing but plant ingredients: a meatless burger, that looks and tastes like meat. The secret ingredient? A chemical compound called heme.

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Food Technology

Nano Product: Bake ‘n Spray

In the instant era, who wants to spend precious time waiting for the oven to preheat and roast the meal? If you’re permanently short of time and often too busy to cook, or if you’re still honing your chef skills, Bake ‘n Spray is the product for you! Thanks to an  exothermic reaction and nanoparticles, Bake ‘n Spray instantly bakes your food, without requiring the oven; you can also use it in combination with microwaves to make sure the inside is cooked to perfection.
Baking has never been so easy: cakes, lasagnas, turkeys…just spray and eat!

From the NANO Supermarket new collection.
Designers: Karin Donkers, Daphne v/d Hurk, Mart Pluijmaekers, Wouter Veldhuis
Package Design: Robin Bergman


More products from the new line: CloudCrayonsThe Healing GameCoating ColaGoogle NoseHostCatad’Or, IDiO

Food Technology

Three Points in Support of In Vitro Meat

In vitro meat is a broad project that bonds many worlds together: animal rights, environmentalism, sustainability, public health, science and the list goes on and on.

The Modern Agriculture Foundation aim is simple: to make the day cultured meat will become a commercially available product arrive as soon as possible. They are hoping in a major step towards the replacement of the conventional meat industry – worldwide. While cultured beef research is getting the focus today thanks to Mark Post’s first hamburger, recently the organization have started a new campaign, for the promotion of cultured chicken meat research.

At the Modern Agriculture Foundation they truly believe cultured meat is the most effective, realistic, global solution to a lot of wrongdoings caused by the traditional meat industry.

Below they elaborated the top three aspects why we should support cultured meat.

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mark post
Meat the Future

No Future for Traditional Meat

At Home in the Lab with Mark Post, Father of the In Vitro Hamburger

We’re standing with Professor Mark Post in front of the three biggest bioreactors in the Netherlands, the machines humming faintly and filled with millions of busily dividing cow cells. While the term ‘bioreactor’ might call to mind a gleaming, swimming pool sized tank, the reality is far more prosaic. You’d be forgiven if you thought they were refrigerators.

Post, the man behind the world’s first lab-grown hamburger, aims for no less than a total transformation of the way we produce meat. “My goal,” he says, “is to replace the entirety of livestock production with in vitro meat.” Post’s relaxed manner belies the scale of his ambitions: “I dream that, at some point, McDonalds will approach me to produce all the hamburgers, all over the world.” By raising meat entirely in a lab, starting with stem cells and ending with full-grown muscle, Post hopes to make meat that’s cheaper, healthier, and more sustainable than the real thing. The everyday quality of the bioreactors in his facility acts as a metaphor for in vitro meat itself: a science-fictional achievement that aspires to not only be normal, but natural.

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