Tag: Food Technology

nanowine01
Anthropocene

How to Avoid a Global Wine Shortage

A global wine shortage is coming. Rising global consumption is contending with European wine production that has been acutely affected by changing weather patterns. Because wine consumption depends on regional grape varieties that are often climate-specific, poor harvests in Italy and France (the two largest global producers of wine, and among the largest consumers too) will lead to a global wine shortage as the 2012 vintage is released.

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MeatFlower__530
Food Technology

Care for a Meat Flower Amuse?

While vegetarian food products typically mimic existing meat products, the meat flower reverses this principle: In vitro technology is used to grow meat in the shape of a flower.

The Meat Flower is illustrative for the diminishing of borders between ‘meat’ and ‘vegetarian’ due to emerging technology: although the cultured meat is grown from animal cells, no animals are hurt and injured in the process.

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Diagram of the steps in making in vitro meat
Food Technology

Grossed Out by Lab-Grown Meat? Here’s 7 Reasons Why You Shouldn’t Be

Many people find the idea of eating in vitro meat – animal muscle tissue grown in a lab – to be creepy, unnatural or downright disgusting. Maybe it’s the association with medical science, or maybe it’s the fact that a happy cow in a grassy meadow seems far more friendly that something scraped from a bioreactor. It turns out, however, that in vitro meat is a lot less unnatural than we think it is, and that “normal” food is far more bizarre than it seems. Here’s the top seven reasons why you shouldn’t be grossed out by lab-grown meat:

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Disposable Food Bowl
Design-for-debate

From Fast Food Packaging to Flowerpot

“Enjoy your food. Then put the seeds from under the label with gravel to the bowl and let it grow. After a week, plant bowl with an herb to the ground. The bowl will degrade and you can grow up your own herb”. This is the challenge of Michal Marko, design student at Tomas Bata University in Zlín, Czech Republic.

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vegetable lamb of tartary
Food Technology

The Sci-Fi Prehistory of “Victimless” Meat

The idea of “disembodied” meat, whether grown from trees or in the lab, has been around for at least a century – if not way longer. The medieval notion of the “vegetable lamb of Tartary”, a live sheep that sprouts from a plant, could be thought of as the great-granddaddy of “victimless” meat. However, the idea of truly in vitro meat had to wait for the invention of cell culture. No doubt French surgeon Alexis Carrell pondered taking a nibble of an immortal drumstick when he created an “immortal” chicken heart cell line in 1912.

Perhaps the earliest explicit mentions of cultured meat comes from British statesman Frederick Edwin Smith. In 1930, Smith predicted that “it will no longer be necessary to go to the extravagant length of rearing a bullock in order to eat its steak. From one ‘parent’ steak of choice tenderness it will be possible to grow as large and as juicy a steak as can be desired.” Winston Churchill famously echoed this sentiment only two years later. According to Technovelty, in vitro meat made its first appearance in fiction in 1952. Since then, sci-fi authors have described inspiring, bizarre and uncanny speculative meat futures. Click through for some of the most evocative…

Next Nature is continuing the tradition of visionary lab-grown meat speculation: Support our crowdfunding campaign for the world’s first in vitro meat cookbook!

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Fake-for-Real

Food Simulator to Fulfill the Desire to Eat

What if in the future we won’t need to shop at the supermarket and to deal with pots and stoves? According to Renata Kuramshina and Caroline Woortmann Lima, master’s students from Dessau Design Department of Anhalt University, we could just seat on a comfortable armchair and use some nasal and oral sensors to satisfy the desire to eat. This device, called Tenet, is designed to replicate the pleasure and emotions received from food and its rituals, without touching a fork or knife. Read more

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Food Technology

Anti-BP Diseased Dolphin Ride

In what’s probably the most fun form of environmental protest ever, Banksy has created a morose-looking dolphin ride to protest the BP oil spill. The ride is complete with fish nets and…

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bunlaiboat500
Back to the Tribe

Invasive Sushi from Invasive Species

Chef Bun Lai of Miya’s Sushi in New Haven, Connecticut, has a cheeky solution to invasive species: he eats them. His menu regularly features lionfish and Asian shore crabs, neither of which…

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