Tag: Guided Growth

Vase
3D Printing

Analogue vs Digital: 3D Printing

In both vases pictured, you can put your flowers into water. Both are analogue objects. The manufacturing process is the analogue/digital difference in this case. The vase pictured at right is a 3D printed vase, completely digitally processed by a 3D printer. It is believed that in the near future we will all have a 3D printer at home. Will we be giving them commands to print our home accessories, food or maybe even our own organs?

From the Analogue vs Digital Memory Game

shutterstock_1131098
Augmented-Bodies

The Future of Artificial Reproduction

The technology behind artificial reproduction is at a level that was unimaginable decades ago, we can now use artificial insemination or in vitro fertilization to create babies without having actual sex. In the future, according to researcher Dr Paul Turek and his team, we could go a step further and use artificial testicles to produce sperm cells.

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2015-NATURE3X-Where-is-Nature-Now-24x36-Poster
Anthropocene

Next Nature Talk at Nature 3.x Symposium

This weekend, Next Nature Network creative director Dr. Van Mensvoort will lecture at Nature 3.x: Where is Nature Now? at University of Minnesota in Minneapolis.

The multi-disciplinary conference is co-organized by Professor Matthew Tucker and Professor Christine Baeumler at the University of Minnesota. The event will bring together professionals from various disciplines to meditate on how the global environmental problems of the Anthropocene change our involvement with nature. The discussion will include post-industrial feral landscape ecology, eco-toxic tourism, manufactured urban ecosystems, post-natural disaster resiliency planning, hypernature and technology, and genetically modified environments.

The symposium is free and public, so make sure to drop by if you live around!

Next Nature @ Nature 3.x: Where is Nature Now?
Saturday, April 18 
5 pm – 6 pm
U of MN Northrop Best Buy Theater, Minneapolis, USA

The new 3D printing method
3D Printing

New 3D Printer Can Save Hours of Time

From buildings to artificial organs, 3D printing has the potential to print almost anything. However, one of the biggest limits of 3D printing is its slow printing speed. The current 3D printing technology prints an item by constructing them layer-by-layer, a process which can take several hours.

A team of researchers at UNC-Chapel Hill recently developed a new method that can reduce the printing process down to minutes.

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Guided Growth

Hyperform: the Future of 3D Printing

“However, while 3D printers are becoming increasingly accessible and capable of rivalling the quality of professional equipment, they are still inherently limited by a small print volume, placing severe constraints on the type and scale of objects we can create.” Says designer Marcelo Coelho. With a very smart construction strategy in mind, Coelho developed together with designer and technologist Skylar Tibbits an algorithmic software named Hyperform.

The algorithm can transforms a needed form – possibly bigger than the printer’s measurement reach – into an origami-like chain structure, which can be unfolded into the bigger final product. Hyperform makes it possible to print bigger forms in a single piece, while the ordinary printers print different parts separately and assemblies them later. “Hyperform encodes assembly information into the actual parts, so there is no need for a separate assembly instruction sheet and parts don’t need to be individually labeled and sorted” says Coelho.

Source: Core77

glowingplanet
Wild Systems

Cities Evolve in Similar Ways as Galaxies

Satellite images of Earth at night evoke ambiguous feelings: While on a ground level our cities appear as purely cultural artifacts, a traveler from outer space might just as well marvel at them as beautifully glowing organic fungi-like structures that sprouted on our planet. Less than a millennium ago, the Earth at night was all dark. Today it is all glowing and blossoming.

Scientists think the laws governing the structure of galaxies in outer space are the same laws underlying the growth of cities. Henry Lin and Abraham Loeb at the Harvard-Smithsonian Centre for Astrophysics have used models for showing how galaxies evolve based on matter density to propose a unifying theory for scaling laws of human populations.

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biofabricate_
Designed-by-Evolution

Biofabricate – NN Lecture in New York

If you happen to be in New York City this week, you may want to join us for BIOFABRICATE, the world’s first summit dedicated to biofabrication for future industrial and consumer products.

The summit features visionary lectures from prominent thinkers and practitioners, including MOMA curator Paola Antonelli, Modern Meadow CEO Andras Forgacs, biocouture CEO Suzanne Lee and our own Koert van Mensvoort. Register here.

BIOFABRICATE
December 4th 2014
MICROSOFT Technology Centre
11 Times Square, between 41st & 42nd Streets on 8th Ave.
New York City

Chloe Rutzerveld
Food Technology

Interview: Chloé Rutzerveld, Designer Who Wants to Grow Healthy 3D Printed Food

The next guest in our interview series is Chloé Rutzerveld, young talented and promising Food and Concept designer, from Eindhoven University of Technology. Chloé is interested in combining aspects of food, design, nature, culture and life sciences in a form of critical design. She uses food as a medium to address, communicate and discuss social, cultural or scientific issues.

Throughout 2014, Chloé worked on a 3D food printing project, titled Edible Growth, to show how high-tech or lab-produced food doesn’t have to be unhealthy, unnatural or not tasteful. Her concept is an example of a future food product fully natural, healthy, and sustainable.

The working principle combines aspects of nature, science, technology and design: multiple layers containing seeds, spores and yeast are printed according to a personalized 3D file. Within five days the plants and fungi mature and the yeast ferments the solid inside into a liquid. Depending on the preferred intensity, the consumer decides when to harvest and eat the edible. While the project is still speculative due to technological limits, the concept is very intriguing.

We recently talked with Chloé about people’s response to Edible Growth, the profession of food designer and new preparation methods and products that could be on our plate one day. Here’s what she had to say:

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