Tag: Humane-Technology

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3D Printing

3D Printed Eyes with WiFi Connection

Nowadays 3D printing is increasingly used for medical purposes and body upgrades to design devices, implants, and a variety of customized prosthetics, from a 3D printed face, to a skull, and even organs.

In the future we may look at the world with new – artificial, 3D printed – eyes. Italian research studio MHOX is working on EYE, a 3D bioprinted sight augmentation. The project envisions the removal of the natural visual system and its replacement with a digitally designed 3D printed one. The original retina would be replaced by a new artificial network, able to offer enhanced vision, WiFi connection and the possibility to record video and take pictures.

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Bionics

Turning Cockroaches into Rescue Robots

Certain natural disasters such as earthquakes and Tsunamis often trap high numbers of people under unstable rubble, making search-and-rescue operations very difficult. Cyborg cockroaches might be of critical help for these disasters.

North Caroline State University carried out a study in 2012, where researchers attached electrodes to the antennae of Madagascar hissing cockroaches to steer them. Currently, the team is working on tiny backpacks attached to the back of cockroaches, to transform these critters into moving networks of sensors.

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Food Technology

After In Vitro Burger, Chicken is the Next

Two years have passed since professor Mark Post announced the arrival of the first in vitro hamburger. Soon, we might be getting a taste of the first lab-grown chicken meat. A bioengineer at Tel Aviv University, Professor Amit Gefen, began a feasibility study funded by a non-profit group called Modern Agriculture Foundation.

The task is much more complex compared to the $300,000 beef burger cooked at Maastricht University, in the Netherlands. Unlike the five-year-long, Google funded project, Gefen aims to grow chicken meat from a single cell.

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Augmented-Bodies

Controlling Smart Devices with the Skin

Wearable devices have become increasingly popular and important in design, with a particular attention to the skin. According to the researchers behind iSkin project, the epidermis is indeed the next frontier.

iSkin is a flexible, stretchable and visually customizable on-body touch sensor for mobile computing. Simply place the patch on any part of the body and you have your own touch interface. With a few simple taps you can answer calls, play music or answer an email.

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Augmented-Bodies

Permanent Eye-Color Change

The reason why blue eyes are considered so appealing is unknown. Researchers ascribe this widespread appreciation to the Paleolithic society, where the few women with blue eyes had better chances of standing out in the crowd; others think it’s due to the fact that pupil dilatation, an indicator of attraction, is more visible in lighter eyes.

Only 17% of the world’s population has blue eyes, the rest can obtain cerulean eyes just with the help of colored contact lenses. But today a new laser surgery can permanently turn eyes from brown to blue.

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Humane-Technology

Dynamic Exoskeleton Chair

Prolonged sitting is a common feature in today’s society. Despite the amount of movements our body is capable of, we spend most of our time in sedentary mode.

To respond to the anti-physical modern technology trends, Eindhoven Design Academy graduate Govert Flint developed the Segregation of Joy project. He designed an exoskeleton chair that allows the body to move freely. The user can control the cursor on his computer screen by moving his body in the chair.

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Artificial Intelligence

Poem Passes the Turing Test

Artificial intelligence has a long way to go and one of the challenges that stands on the road to success is the Turing Test. Developed by Alan Turing in the fifties, the test measures AI ability to exhibit intelligent behavior equivalent to, or indistinguishable from, that of a human. Zackary Scholl developed a program to produce a poem that passed the Turing Test, questioning the source reliability of creative materials.

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Guided Growth

Hyperform: the Future of 3D Printing

“However, while 3D printers are becoming increasingly accessible and capable of rivalling the quality of professional equipment, they are still inherently limited by a small print volume, placing severe constraints on the…

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Augmented-Bodies

Electronic Skin can Detect Magnetic Fields

As we all know, there are five basic human senses, but this doesn’t mean there could not be many more. One of the senses that we don’t have magnetoception: the ability to perceive magnetic fields. Some bacteria, migratory birds, fish and some invertebrates use this skill to have a better sense of direction. A new artificial skin technology might be able to give humans magnetoception in the future.

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Augmented-Bodies

Implanting Chips into Employees

No more identifications badges, a Swedish office block is taking security to the next level. The hi-tech building implanted a microchip under the employees’ skin, into their hands. The computer chip allows the workers to entry the edifice, open doors and even use the photocopier. Instead of swiping ID, workers will move their hands across scanners able to detect the chip injected into the hand.

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Design-for-debate

Experimental Office: No Chairs, No Desks

How natural is it to work from nine to five sitting on a chair behind a desk, staring at a computer screen, wearing a suit and tie? Although it is today’s standard, genetically people aren’t really attuned to this norm. To counter the sitting dogma, design firm RAAAF and artist Barbara Visser experimented with more dynamic office concept, entirely based on movement and leaning.

The next office is meant to help combat all of the health problems—from heart disease to diabetes—that the typical desk job can contribute to or exacerbate. Throughout the day, people lean in different positions and keep moving around the room.  Supported by giant rock-like sculptures that presumably invite to a healthier, more active way to work than anything that’s come before.

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