Tag: Humane-Technology

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Govert Flint Designer Interview
Office Garden

Interview: Govert Flint, Designer Applying Motion to Everyday Life

He is mostly known for his Bionic Chair, an exoskeleton chair in where the user can control a computer through body movements, but beside product design Govert Flint has worked as an architect in Shanghai, he is a self-taught artist and he’s got the moves, as you can see in this video clip of Run Boy by Keymono. In dancing he found the rationale of his work, exploring how movement can be implemented in everyday life. According to Govert “the body complements the brain” and our environment needs to be designed to that end. To emotionally release ourselves we need to stand-up – away from the computer – and move freely. However, as his Bionic Chair shows, the solution lies not in abandoning the computer but by offering alternative ways of interacting with it.

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thought collider, Mike Thompson and Susana Camara Leret
Next Nature

Interview: Mike Thompson and Susana Cámara Leret, Designers Exploring Alternative Ways of Thinking & Doing

Their work is rooted in design, has a flavor of art and a profound touch of science. It’s a blend of different types of knowledge that brings forth new knowledge. Central to their approach is an open-ended and all-inclusive mindset. Western science is as legitimate as indigenous traditions. In their opinion all knowledge is complementary. Their work ranges from the absurd to the scientific, from the experimental to the groundbreaking. Mike Thompson and Susana Cámara Leret are the minds behind Thought Collider, an experimental, critical art-design research practice based in Amsterdam.

Often their materials of choice are both everyday and completely out of the ordinary. In their project Aqua Vita they used urine as a source of information. With Fatberg, an on-going collaboration between Mike and Arne Hendriks, they are building an island of fat, which should one day roam the oceans. And their latest project: The Institute for the Design of Tropical Disease attempts to create a space where other types of discussion related to tropical disease can take place – discussions that are more imaginative than dogmatic.

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Facebook suicide prevention tool
Society of Simulations

Facebook Provides a Suicide Prevention Tool

Let’s say an old schoolmate, whom you haven’t spoken to in ages but is your friend on Facebook, posts a status update that sounds like a suicide note. What to do? Message the friend? Then what to say? Facebook is setting up a tool that advises what to do and directly seeks contact with the person who might be on the brinck of committing suicide. Is a social network morally obliged to have such a feature or is it trespassing privacy borders? This is a sensitive topic.

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Payment by thumb
Augmented Bodies

Payment by Thumb

Forget about cash and credit cards, in the not too distant future we will need just one finger to shop: the thumb. For one person in particular this dream is getting closer to reality thanks to a near-field communications (NFC) chip embed in his hand. He is Australian biohacker Meow-Ludo Meow Meow (he legally changed his name) and he is part of a movement of people who are merging their bodies with technology.

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Fellow Day, about the next nature project Next Senses
Augmented Bodies

Fellow Day 2016: Next Senses

If you could have another sense, which sense would you choose? Would you like to have the ability to sense electromagnetic fluctuations like sharks do? Would you prefer to hear the urban soundscape of WiFi signals? Or would you like an extra organ that regulates the usage and sensitivity of the senses you already have? Recently our NNN fellows, people from different disciplines working in and around the next nature theme, came together to explore the uncharted territory of a new project: Next Senses. How do we want to perceive the world? The world we live in has changed drastically over the ages, but our everyday means of perceiving it remained the same. Isn’t it time to reevaluate the way we access to the outer world?

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recreating second skin to look younger
Augmented Bodies

Creating a Second Skin to Look Younger

Staying young has been a human desire for as long as we can remember. Cleopatra used to take milk baths to preserve her beauty and youth, today we apply expensive creams to achieve the same result. But all these special treatment didn’t even come close to what we wanted to achieve. So in the end, we just had to accept the reality of time. Until now. Scientists at MIT, Massachusetts General Hospital, Living Proof, and Olivo Labs managed to create what every woman has been dreaming of: a second skin to reduce wrinkles and tighten the skin.

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A surveillance system that predicts and prevents crime
Suburban Utopia

A System that Predicts Crime

Clubs, bars, cafes and the streets that connect them are the hotspots for a night out. Occasionally, the combination of crowded spaces and alcohol usage can cause unpleasant situations, such as aggressions. To prevent acts of aggression, a new smart surveillance system is being tested in Stratumseind, a street of Eindhoven with the longest concatenation of nightlife venues in the Netherlands. This new system can identify a growing conflict and direct the police to it, before anyone could throw a punch.

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turkish shepherds always connected
Manufactured Animals

Solar-Powered Donkeys to Stay Online

Our peculiar image of the week features the innovation of the Turkish shepherds. To stay connected they fasten solar panels and battery packs to the donkeys that accompany them to the desolate mountains. Thanks to the energy produced, they can stay online and power lights. Connectivity is a powerful tool for economic progress, and it can often represent the difference between life or death in poor rural areas.

Image: Getty Images