Tag: Hypernature

Pentagonal Oranges 2

Pentagonal Orange

After the Modernistic Watermelon and the Cubic Fruit, Japanese farmers have designed the pentagon-shaped orange. These citrus fruits called Gokaku no Iyokan, which means “sweet smell of success in exams”, were given as a good luck charm for students in the upcoming entrance exam season in Yawatahama, Ehime.

Flat sided fruits seem to have some positive aspects: they are easier to put into a box or in the refrigerator than round fruits, and their peculiarity could encourage people to eat them, arousing curiosity. We guess in the near future more fruit varieties will develop angles!

Source: Daily Mail

the nano slimfast diet cybernetic implant to lose weight

Diet-in-a-Pill Promises Weight Loss with Synthetic Genes

The NANO Supermarket’s (speculative) Nano Slim-Fast Diet uses a tasty cocktail of leptin, peptide YY, and other hormones to naturally control your appetite. Researchers have now concocted a similar diet aid in the form of an implantable “circuit” made from synthetic genes. The circuit, consisting of several genes that govern satiety, monitors the fat levels in blood. When the circuit detects excess fat, it releases a chemical telling the brain that it’s no longer hungry.

With the help of these slimming implants, obese rats lost a significant amount of body weight, despite having unrestricted access to a high-fat diet. Least you worry about the circuit going into overdrive and the now-slender rats wasting away, the genes are assembled to allow hunger to return once blood fat levels are back to normal. With the holiday season coming up, maybe the best present you can get your family is a pill full of Slim-Fast genes.

Via Io9.


Squared Romanticism

Initially you seem to be looking at just another clichéd landscape painting, but then you discover the branches are squared and things become more interesting.

Is this perhaps a recently discovered late Mondrian painting in which the master of abstraction returned to his landscape painting roots? Or was the tree transported in a square box, before it was planted there to satisfy our longing for a natural landscape?

The squared tree leaves you with the uncanny feeling that the naturalness we habitually indulge in, is merely an illusion presented by a system that aims to remain invisible itself.

Our peculiar image of the week was created by Persijn Broersen & Margit Lucács.

Artificial Womb

The Birth of the Artificial Womb

Scientists at Juntendo University in Tokyo have developed a practice called EUFI, extrauterine fetal incubation. In EUFI, the researchers take goat fetuses, thread catheters through the large vessels in the umbilical cord and supply the fetuses with oxygenated blood while suspending them in incubators that contain artificial amniotic fluid heated to body temperature.

It may seem that Aldous Huxley’s words from Brave New World have come to life: “One by one the eggs were transferred from their test-tubes to the larger containers; deftly the peritoneal lining was slit, the morula dropped into place, the saline solution poured . . . and already the bottle had passed on through an opening in the wall, slowly on into the Social Predestination Room”.

Find more on Before It’s News.

Food Technology

Care for a Meat Flower Amuse?

While vegetarian food products typically mimic existing meat products, the meat flower reverses this principle: In vitro technology is used to grow meat in the shape of a flower.

The Meat Flower is illustrative for the diminishing of borders between ‘meat’ and ‘vegetarian’ due to emerging technology: although the cultured meat is grown from animal cells, no animals are hurt and injured in the process.

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Diagram of the steps in making in vitro meat
Food Technology

Grossed Out by Lab-Grown Meat? Here’s 7 Reasons Why You Shouldn’t Be

Many people find the idea of eating in vitro meat – animal muscle tissue grown in a lab – to be creepy, unnatural or downright disgusting. Maybe it’s the association with medical science, or maybe it’s the fact that a happy cow in a grassy meadow seems far more friendly that something scraped from a bioreactor. It turns out, however, that in vitro meat is a lot less unnatural than we think it is, and that “normal” food is far more bizarre than it seems. Here’s the top seven reasons why you shouldn’t be grossed out by lab-grown meat:

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beef tree ready for the grill
Food Technology

The Woods Smell of Meat

A team of plaid-clad butchers have spotted a mature meat tree deep within the bacon-scented woods. Armed with hatchets and bone saws, the men chop the tree into logs. Back at the slaughter-mill, a quick bath in scalding water removes the tree’s dense layer of fur. Its bark is cured for leather. Its central supporting bone is cleaned and shipped out for use in construction and plumbing. The meat tree, however, is most prized for its succulent flesh. Meat tree logs can be seen rotating in the windows of many shawarma and döner kebab cafes. In the image above, a bûche de Noël has been sliced into bone-in ribeye steaks for a delicious, sustainable holiday dinner.

Image via Vancouver Fine Arts.