Tag: Hypernature

Hydrogel farming
Food Technology

Soil-Free Farming in the Desert

Throughout the lands of the Persian Gulf, desertification is a fact of life. As a result, the countries of this region import 90 percent of their food supply. A new technology developed by visionary researchers at the Waseda University, in Japan, might have found the solution to this problem. A special absorbent film that require no soil may be able to grow plants more efficiently than soil farming.

The research team, lead by Professor Yuichi Mori, has developed a hydrogel film that can hold 1,000 times of its weight in water. The scientists are already testing these films in 180 film farms.

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indoor-farm
Food Technology

The World’s Largest Indoor Farm

Humans have mastered agriculture for the last 10.000 years, during which different climates, cultures, and technologies have driven and defined farming development. Nevertheless, a summer storm, voracious pests or a bad drought can still ruin the harvest and destroy months of hard work. But not anymore, according to Japanese plant physiologist Shigeharu Shimamura, who transfered intensive agriculture under the roof.

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‘Flowerworks’, by Sara Illenberger. Photography: Sabrina Rynas
Calm-technology

Happy Next Nature!

Time measurement tools are perhaps among the most inventive technologies mankind has produced, as it enables us to articulate ‘natural’ time (in the form of lunar years, sun eclipse, tidal waves, seasons…

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palmtree_antenna
Biomimicmarketing

Palm Tree Antenna

Spotted near Las Vegas and Hurghada, Egypt. If you know any cellphone tree antenna masts in your neighborhood. Use the Next Nature spotting app for iPhone to add them.

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img_1387
Design-for-debate

Domestication as a Last Refuge

Domestication of flora and fauna is a concept that humans have been using to control nature in our advantage already since 33000 BC. A nowadays example are ‘house plants’ which have gone through generations of selective breeding to eventually give the best flowers, in extraordinary colours and unexpected shapes.
A usual by-product of domestication is the creation of a dependency in the domesticated organisms, so that they lose their ability to live in the wild. From an animal and plants perspective this could be considered as a deprivation of their right to freedom. Human interventions in the last couple of decades resulted often in a shrinking natural habitat for many species and populations. Being on the edge of extinction, domestication might be their only refuge?

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urbangreen_08-copy
Hypernature

Urban Green

In the 18th century French philosopher Voltaire said “God created the world, but the Dutch created The Netherlands”. Ever since, we have been doing everything we can, to live up to his statement; as illustrated by this series of pictures by photographer Jacob Gesink shot in various Dutch cities.

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Hypernature

Change Your Notion Of Nature

A message for all you Next Nature readers from the one and only Snow White, who knows a thing or two about Hypernature. Download the Next Nature Appzine for free and change…

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Raised On YouTube
Guided Growth

Growing Crops with Video Projections

From food, to medicine, to material, it was plants that once guided human culture. Now that our culture is the most powerful force on the planet, how does it treat our green cousins? The Internet is awash with culture’s output, especially videos.

To recycle culture into fertilizer, the Raised on YouTube project aims to grow plants using only the dancing light and sound of algorithmically curated video.

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eternal reef
Anthropocene

Spend Eternity As An Artificial Coral Reef

Coral reefs are suffering degradation from a number of natural and human-induced causes. American company, Eternal Reefs, had a peculiar idea to help preserve, protect, and enhance the oceans’ health.

They offer to their clients the possibility – after death – to have ashes made into a rock to form the base of an “eternal memorial reef” to provide a habitat for sea-life.

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