Tag: Hyperreality

whale and drone
Microbial Factories

Bacteria and Drones: New Ways to Collect Samples

Sample collection in hard-to-reach and harsh environments has often made scientific research a costly and dangerous exercise. Luckily technology has helped us overcome some of these difficulties.

Although costly robots, for instance, have for a long time been the equipment of choice to collect samples in space. But there is a new competitor for the robot space-sample collector. Experiments have shown that a remarkable amount of small organisms are able to survive in space. ESA researchers have send living kombucha bacteria into space to look for signs of life.

Read more


Seeing the Sun Through Data

Between its 149 million km distance from earth and its extreme brightness, the sun has never been easy to observe. Ever since we started looking into the sky we’ve needed special lenses, photographs, telescopes and sunglasses to get the slightest glance at it. Today however, with more advanced imaging technology and orbiting telescopes, we’re getting a better look. The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space museum has taken this observation to the next level with a giant public display of images and data that show the sun in hyper-real detail.

Read more


Experience Van Gogh in Virtual Reality

Have you ever got the chance to experience Van Gogh’s art pieces? What about having a 360 degrees look at the Dutch painter world? An interesting idea by America animator Mac Cauley: he spent months designing 3D environments based on The Night Café, and created a new way to experience paintings in virtual reality.

Read more


Mini’s Augmented Reality Driving Goggles

Always fascinated by Iron Man’s helmet that provides Tony Stark with augmented reality information? Mini cars are working on something similar, minus the attack mode. Now owned by BMW, the popular car brand is developing augmented reality goggles that enhance the driving experience.

Read more


Permanent Eye-Color Change

The reason why blue eyes are considered so appealing is unknown. Researchers ascribe this widespread appreciation to the Paleolithic society, where the few women with blue eyes had better chances of standing out in the crowd; others think it’s due to the fact that pupil dilatation, an indicator of attraction, is more visible in lighter eyes.

Only 17% of the world’s population has blue eyes, the rest can obtain cerulean eyes just with the help of colored contact lenses. But today a new laser surgery can permanently turn eyes from brown to blue.

Read more

Source: http://www.modernisminc.com/artists/Jonathon_KEATS/?image=SPACETIME_INDUSTRIES-1

Seconds for Sale: Domestication of Time

As society is moving more rapidly and people are busier than ever, a need arises to change the passage of time accordingly. Einstein showed how time is relative and influenced by gravitational force. Time Ingot, by experimental philosopher Jonathon Keats, is a first step to domesticate this relativity for practical human needs.

The ingot is a solid piece of lead alloy, neatly packaged. Due to the compact size, it can be used to manage time on a desktop or on a bed stand. Its mass slows down time in the immediate vicinity. Ideal for planning competitive business or slightly extending lifespan.

With less than one extra second every billion years, the effect is not directly noticeable, and the $19.99 Time Ingot is already out of sale. But at least, it gives us the small opportunity to literally manage time, instead of letting time manage us.

Story and image via The Atlantic


The Most Romantic City? Not Paris!

Thinking about Valentine’s Day destinations, San Bruno in California is not the first city that comes to mind. But it’s the only place with a hearth-shaped neighborhood, called Cupid Row. The “Heart Area” was laid out 100 years ago and the reason seems to be that people used to go to San Bruno to get away from San Francisco and spend time in little vacation cottages in Cupid Row.

Peculiar image of the week and Valentine’s Day wish. Via Love These Pics


Welcome to the Hearth of the Sun

Life on Earth could not exist without the gigantic nuclear power station of the sun. If it “turned off”, the life on our planet would end. Solarium, a video installation by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), puts visitors in the hearth of the sun, surrounded by dynamic visuals of the giant star’s turbulent gas atmosphere exploding and erupting.

In the last five years SDO has been watching the sun, taking one picture a second and collecting data. The imagery was then paired with audio created at Stanford University in California, with the end result being a truly immersive setting.

The installation permits the viewer to plunge directly in the sun and to closely enjoy an artificial but nonetheless magnificent indoor sun. Luckily, the real sun is expected to remain on for the next few billion years.

Source: artfuture

magnetoceptor skin bubble

Electronic Skin can Detect Magnetic Fields

As we all know, there are five basic human senses, but this doesn’t mean there could not be many more. One of the senses that we don’t have magnetoception: the ability to perceive magnetic fields. Some bacteria, migratory birds, fish and some invertebrates use this skill to have a better sense of direction. A new artificial skin technology might be able to give humans magnetoception in the future.

Read more