Tag: Hyperreality

hitech in sports
Suburban Utopia

How Is Hi-Tech Changing Sports?

Business and sports go hand by hand, but also hi-tech is now stepping in. A group of entrepreneurs from the Silicon Valley, such as Google, Apple, Facebook, PayPal and Yahoo, will start a professional soccer team in San Francisco, The San Francisco Deltas. They hope to use virtual reality to improve athletes’ performances – for example, the goalkeeper’s reflex – first in training and then in the actual game. Their ultimate goal is to have a new format in order to improve the show for the public.

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Beijing Blur
Information Decoration

Smog: an Augmented Reality?

A few days ago, these images of iconic buildings in Beijing as they look with and without intense smog have been posted on Weibo, one of China’s most popular social media platforms. Interestingly, these images speak the visual language of augmented reality apps, in which an additional layer of information is projected on top of the perceptible environment as seen through the lens of a camera, usually on a hand-held device. But in this particular case, an interesting reversal seems to take place.

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whale and drone
Microbial Factories

Bacteria and Drones: New Ways to Collect Samples

Sample collection in hard-to-reach and harsh environments has often made scientific research a costly and dangerous exercise. Luckily technology has helped us overcome some of these difficulties.

Although costly robots, for instance, have for a long time been the equipment of choice to collect samples in space. But there is a new competitor for the robot space-sample collector. Experiments have shown that a remarkable amount of small organisms are able to survive in space. ESA researchers have send living kombucha bacteria into space to look for signs of life.

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Seeing the Sun Through Data

Between its 149 million km distance from earth and its extreme brightness, the sun has never been easy to observe. Ever since we started looking into the sky we’ve needed special lenses, photographs, telescopes and sunglasses to get the slightest glance at it. Today however, with more advanced imaging technology and orbiting telescopes, we’re getting a better look. The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space museum has taken this observation to the next level with a giant public display of images and data that show the sun in hyper-real detail.

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