Tag: Hyperreality

Digital-Presence

Clouding the brain

Man is a flexible species. We tend to adapt quite rapidly to new environments. But how fast can these adaptations turn to new evolutionary traits? For instance: to what extent is the internet changing our cognitive capabilities?

Back in the day, the story goes, we could remember whole bible stories. We could even sing entire newspapers. Because there weren’t any, we had to remember it all. That changed with the invention of book printing. Remembering became less important and instead, as philosopher Walter Ong claimed, our brains could focus more on comparing and analyzing. So our analytical skills grew.

Read more (2 replies)

Anthropomorphobia

Social Avatar Beats Death

Avatars are commonly known as virtual characters in the digital realm representing a user. But what if avatars could house personal history, profile and ideas? Could that enable us to make decisions after we have died?

LifeNaut, has a free service called “Mind File” that lets you digitally backup the organic brain:

“A Mindfile is a web-based storage space for organizing and preserving critical information (digital reflections) about one’s unique and essential characteristics for the future, and to share with friends and relatives in the present.”

The subscribing process comes down to putting stuff in a database, including an expressionless photo, which LifeNaut automatically turns into a lifelike, blinking and talking avatar that functions as a visual interface, ready to interact with you and others —  including your descendants!

Backup your brain and live forever.

Via Newscientist.com

Augmented-Bodies

Fat/slim magnifying label

With an optical trick, this German bottle of water is trying to prove its effectiveness for the body. Though drinking water is a necessity for life, the downside of this product is, that it takes approximately 8 litres of virtual water to produce 1 litre of bottled water. Drinking water may look good on the body… The carbon footprint is BIG AND FAT.

Global-Image-Economy

Augmented (Hyper)Reality

In his short animation Augmented (Hyper)Reality, Keiichi Matsuda’s offers a glimpse of an alternate universe, with augmented reality cranked up to the next level. But what to think of these kind of slick animations that provide us with either utopian or dystopian visions of our technofuture?

Read more (2 replies)

Biomimicmarketing

Nano Care™ Blueberry Paste Wax

Surely we are quite attuned to some unexpected flavors in these quarters, but this Nano Care™ Blueberry Paste Wax wins our syncretic mash-up award for combining technorethoric with biomimicmarketing.

Who wouldn’t fall for the prospect of giving your car an all-natural-hi-tech massage with a Nanotech Blueberry wax? The creators of the car wax must have wanted to make sure they would reach all imaginable target groups with their product.

“This easy to use formula uses nano-technology based polishing agents and waxes for enhanced surface penetration, durability and gloss. Nano Care Blueberry Paste Wax is made with pure Carnauba and Nano waxes and contains no abrasives. Because it contains a special non-swirl agent Blueberry Paste Wax is especially effective on dark or bright colored cars.”

Sometimes it seems the surrealists were telling the truth after all. Peculiar product of the week.

Digital-Presence

Virtual Characters tortured for Science

virtual milgrim

In the classic Milgram Experiment conducted in the 1960s, volunteers were told by an authority figure to deliver electric shocks to another person as punishment for incorrect answers to a test. The other person wasn’t really receiving the shocks, but the volunteers were tricked into thinking they were by shouts of pain and protest. Despite this feedback, some volunteers went on to deliver what would have been lethal shocks.

Professor Mel Slater of the Catalan Polytechnic University has recreated the Milgram experiment using a computer simulated woman, with some interesting results. “The main conclusion of our study is that humans tend to respond realistically at subjective, physiological, and behavioural levels in interaction with virtual characters notwithstanding their cognitive certainty that they are not real.” Some part of the brain just doesn’t know about virtual reality.

Via Medgadget. Related: A Society of Simulations, AutimacyAvatar Machine, If avatars could vote, WOWOW.

Welcome back!

We have noticed you are a frequent visitor to our website. Do you think we are doing a good job? Support us by becoming a member.

Join