Tag: Image-Consumption

Madidi titi
Biomimicmarketing

The Monkey Named After a Website

You’re looking at the madidi titi, also know as the Goldenpalace.com titi – the first species whose name is also an ad. Discovered in 2004, the honor of naming this new monkey was auctioned off  to raise funds for the national park it calls home. Since its christening as Callicebus aureipalatii, however, there’s no evidence that the titi enjoys online gambling any more than it used it.

Image via Nova Taxa.

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Back to the Tribe

Face ‘doek’

This Face ‘doek’ (Dutch for blanket) was designed by eighteen year old Noortje van Steenis and put in the corridor of her high school as a protest against the addiction of her fellow students to Facebook. She doesn’t have a Facebook account herself. The Facedoek functions like an old fashioned announcement space. Everyone is allowed to write on it. Peculiar image of the week. Picture by Marcel van den Berg.

hermit crab
Image-Consumption

Crystalline Cityscapes for Homeless Hermit Crabs

Japanese artist Aki Inomata is lending a helping hand to homeless hermit crabs. Armed with a 3D printer and a CAT-scan of actual snail shells, Inomata has created a series of surreal, gorgeous shells adorned with famous cityscapes. Though the artist’s pet crab preferred to make its home in a model of the Moroccan city Ait-Ben-Haddou, we (of course) have a soft spot for the version covered in Dutch windmills.

Via The Guardian.

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Design-for-debate

I’ll Take A Variety of Fried Gadgets, Please

American photographer Henry Hargreaves inspects humans’ relationship with nutrition and global consumption. The result is the Deep Fried Gadgets project, a series of photos showing technological devices covered in batter and fried: a mobile phone, a tablet, an mp3, a laptop and even a Gameboy.

These images make us think about the fact that our consumption of electronic tools has something in common with the concept of fast food.

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Food Technology

Food Familiarization #3: Mimicry

This is the second part in a series that examines the different ways new foods become naturalized parts of our diets. Part 1, Part 2

Food mimics try to look and taste like whatever they’re replacing. Veggie burgers, veggie sausages, even the dreaded vegan bacon, all exist to comfort the nostalgic vegetarian. These meat-mimics imply that a change in diet doesn’t mean a loss of deep-seated cultural rituals. You can still barbecue and eat a full English breakfast. Sort of. 

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Global-Image-Economy

In the (Physical) Cloud

Could this be my external hard disk? By combining smoke, moisture and dramatic lighting, Dutch artist Berndnaut Smilde created this cloud, an extremely temporary work.

friedrich de grosse
Food Technology

Food Familiarization #2: Celebrity Endorsement

This is the second part in a series that examines the different ways new foods become naturalized parts of our diets. For part one, click here

Potatoes are an evil, unchristian tuber, a food so disgusting that even dogs refuse to eat it. Or, if you’re European, that’s what you might still think, if not for the aristocracy’s work to popularize the potato in the 1700s. Though we associate the celebrity endorsement with vapid talk shows and magazine spreads, in reality it’s been around for centuries, and it’s played a far more serious role than we give it credit for.

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