Tag: Image-Consumption

Painting
Digital-Presence

Analogue vs Digital: Interactive Van Gogh

Did Vincent van Gogh ever imagine his paintings would be sold for millions? Sure he didn’t think of the fact that this painting from 1889 would be interactive, and available in the Appstore. Yes, you can touch this painting!

Petros Vrellis has created an interactive visualization and synthesizer that animates Van Gogh’s Starry Night. A fluid simulation gently creates a flowing fabric from Van Gogh’s impressionist portrait of the Milky Way and night sky using the thick paint daubs as the particles within the fluid. With a simple touch you can deform the image, altering both the flow of the particles and the synthesized sound, and then watch it slowly return to its original state.

From the Analogue vs Digital Memory Game.

Cats
Digital-Presence

Your Cat Can Post on Instagram Now

Do you take photos of your cat, but wish there was a way for your pet to take snapshot and share it on Instagram by itself? Thanks to a camera developed by the cat food brand Whiskas, this might soon be a reality.

Named Catstacam, the system comes with a collar camera which takes six photos every minute. When it comes within the range of a WiFi network, the camera shares them on an Instagram account created for your cat. Prototypes of Catstacam have been distributed to cats owned by celebrities already.

If this is not a joke, we predict a lot of cat lovers will want to get their hands on this product. You can check some of the photos shared by tester cats here.

Story and image via Design Taxi

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Food Technology

Junk Food or Tobacco?

Unhealthy diets are now a greater threat to global health than tobacco. Just as the world came together to regulate the risk of tobacco, a bold framework convention on adequate diet must now be agreed.

Here is an article from the opening address of the sixtieth session of The World Health Organization’s Assembly, Geneva, Switzerland, about the future position of junk food.

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idea-spoon
Image-Consumption

Teasing the Internet of Things

The Internet of Things (IoT) products range from smart frying pans that check if the food is cooked, to wearables that track your health. When there is such abundance of areas where IoT could be applied, several ridiculous, unnecessary products are inevitable. Rehabstudio, a creative technology company, draws attention to this pitfall with a parody blog called The Internet of Useless Things.

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Led religion
Image-Consumption

In This Church We Only Take Credit Cards

“Credit cards only” at the Sanctuary of Caravaggio, in the province of Bergamo, Italy. A POS that allows devotees to turn on electric candles, book Masses and make donations to the church with credit card offerings. That must have seemed like a good idea to the Dean of the Sanctuary, that receive over two million of visitors every year.

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Brand Territory

Minimalist Effect in the Maximalist Market

In the 21st century, where we are surrounded by huge amounts of data, it was almost inevitable to turn design preferences towards simplicity and less information overload. With this in mind, in 2010 the multidisciplinary design consultancy Antrepo Team created a project named Minimalist Effect in the Maximalist Market. Their goal is to meditate on the most desirable and simplistic packaging and labeling of well-known supermarket products.

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FB graffiti1
Back to the Tribe

FB Graffiti: Reviving Ancient impulses

Modern technologies can revive ancient impulses. The Chrome plug-in FB Graffity, by programmer Joel Simon, adapts the graffiti mentality to the virtual world, urns photo albums and Facebook posts into a digital cave.
Turning the original metaphor of Facebook – the wall – into a digital cave, the extension lets anyone “vandalize” the pictures shared by other users on the social media. As prehistoric cave paintings, all drawings are public, anonymous and permanent, without undo or erase options.
Modernity has tried to whitewash our tribal spirit, but our inner caveman is irrepressible!

Related Posts: Cavemen Used ‘Facebook’ AlreadyModern Cave Painting

IMG_5241
Fake-for-Real

The Candle of the Future

If the pandemic of bees will continue, among the various damages this will bring, there might be the disappearance of wax. Luckily we will still be able to have candlelight dinner with My New Flame. This unconventional centerpiece, by London based designer Moritz Waldemeyer, uses LED technology to faithfully recreate the experience of light from the ancient past. Thanks to an algorithm that makes sure the sequence of movements never repeats, My New Flame mimics the natural behavior of fire accurately.

The digital candle is less polluting and more sustainable than smoldering old fashioned wax candles, but not for our wallet, as it costs $600. If you can afford it, we suggest you to use it to create the perfect atmosphere for a virtual dinner.

Source: The Creators Project