Tag: Image-Consumption

birds-flight-paths-dennis-hlynsky-3
Humane-Technology

Flight Paths Of Birds Captured On Video

US-based artist and animation professor Dennis Hlynsky visually isolated the flight paths of birds. He filmed the movements of different flocks flying and, using digital editing techniques, he turned this video into a surreal experience of shapes forming overhead.

Read more

Hyperreality

Breathing Lights

Inspired by the movement of spider webs in the wind, Dutch designer Jeroen Van Der Meij created Breathing Lights.

Read more

allnaturalblueberries-530x749
Fake-nature

All-Natural E-nemies

Chemistry teacher James Kennedy sat down to show us that if we speak in terms of good and evil, Mother Nature’s products are far sneakier and complex than the lab’s. He virtually listed all the ingredients of non-GM fruits (excluding pesticides, fertilizers, insecticides or other contaminants), to reveal 13 E-numbers “naturally” packed in your morning blueberries, together with flavorings and fresh air.

Read more

pepsi-eggplant_
Biomimicmarketing

Pepsi Aubergine

Occasionally you bump into an image that seems related to our next nature quest, but you are unable to verbalize.

Read more

Jean-Marc Cote illustration 1899 uncirculated, kitchen in 2000, published in Isaac Asimov's Futuredays 1986
Food Technology

Bizarre Retro-Futuristic Visions of Meat

Turns out that people have been concerned about the realities of meat consumption for quite a while. This is an illustration produced in 1899 by Jean-Marc Cote. The illustrations were made for a company that went out of  business before they could be circulated, but a set was discovered much later and reproduced in a book with commentary by Isaac Asimov. Cote envisioned the kitchen of the year 2000, where food is produced in a chemistry lab rather than in a traditional kitchen.

Click through to see more retro-futuristic predictions, including a miniature factory farm and fields sprouting with “fat plants” and “meat beets”.

Read more

Image via breakingcopy.com
Biomimicmarketing

How Much is a Polar Bear Worth?

About $420,000, if you ask Canada. According to a report commissioned by the Canadian government, its citizens would be willing to pay $6.3 billion dollars per year to ensure that the white creatures continue to wander their vast arctic home. That’s about $500 per household, and with around 15,000 polar bears in Canada today, it equates to about $420,000 per bear. Look at the numbers a little closer, though, and you may notice that the direct benefits associated with the bears (mostly tourism and hunting) add up to a statistically insignificant $9 million per year, meaning that nearly all of the value of polar bears (at least to Canada) is qualitative, or something along the lines of “we just like them.” But why?

Read more

Fake-for-Real

NASA Solves the Toxic ‘New Car Smell’

The car buying experience is really a ritual – the glass-walled showroom, the pushy salesmen, the shiny just-waxed cars that feel like yours at the very first touch – and then there’s that new-car smell. Its a little bit like fresh paint, or old leather, but whatever it is makes it feel like the car just rolled off the assembly line. It turns out that new-car smell is a toxic soup of VOCs (volatile organic compounds) released by plastic parts inside the car. Last year, NASA researchers developed a remarkable coating that permanently seals in these gases for use in confined environments where out-gassing plastic poses a deadly threat. Despite this, car companies are working to find their own solution. So what still seems to be the problem?

Read more