Tag: Image-Consumption

birds-flight-paths-dennis-hlynsky-3
Humane-Technology

Flight Paths Of Birds Captured On Video

US-based artist and animation professor Dennis Hlynsky visually isolated the flight paths of birds. He filmed the movements of different flocks flying and, using digital editing techniques, he turned this video into a surreal experience of shapes forming overhead.

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Hyperreality

Breathing Lights

During his Bachelor in Industrial Design at the Eindhoven University of Technology, Dutch designer Jeroen Van Der Meij created Breathing Lights. Inspired by the elegant fluctuation of spider webs in the breeze, these light objects make movements that evoke associations with breathing. The dynamic installation creates a naturally calming atmosphere; it is quite interesting to see how an artificial setting can become so delicate. Are you able to look closer and find the beauty in plastic bags blowing by the wind?

allnaturalblueberries-530x749
Fake-nature

All-Natural E-nemies

Chemistry teacher James Kennedy sat down to show us that if we speak in terms of good and evil, Mother Nature’s products are far sneakier and complex than the lab’s. He virtually listed all the ingredients of non-GM fruits (excluding pesticides, fertilizers, insecticides or other contaminants), to reveal 13 E-numbers “naturally” packed in your morning blueberries, together with flavorings and fresh air.

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televised_sunrise
Image-Consumption

The Sunrise is Now Televised in Beijing

According to the Daily Mail the smog in Beijing has become so thick that only place to hail a sunrise is on the huge digital commercial television screens across the city.

Last week the reading for particles of PM2.5 pollution was 26 times as high as the 25 micrograms considered safe by the World Health Organization.

In response to the poor air conditions Beijing’s mayor pledged to cut coal use by 2.6 million tonnes and set aside 15 billion yuan to improve air quality this year as part of the city’s ‘all-out effort’ to tackle air pollution.

Thanks Andrea Graziano.

pepsi-eggplant_
Biomimicmarketing

Pepsi Aubergine

Occasionally you bump into an image that seems related to our next nature quest, but you are unable to verbalize. If you have an idea, please enlighten us dear intelligent readers. For now it is our peculiar image of the week. Thanks Selby.

the reason why cities have squirrels
Image-Consumption

Squirrels Are in Cities to Keep Us Sane

If you stroll through a park in an American city, you might assume that all the squirrels you see got there on their own. After all, where there’s trees, there’s usually nuts, and where’s there’s nuts, there’s squirrels. But it turns out that those nut-bearing trees were specifically planted to support squirrels, and that all those squirrels were brought there on purpose. It turns out the existence of urban squirrels is linked to a history of changing attitudes towards nature, the wilderness, and animals:

The squirrel fad really took off in the 1870s, thanks to Frederick Law Olmstead’s expansive parks… the movement to fill the parks with squirrels “was related to the idea that you want to have things of beauty in the city, but it was also part of a much broader ideology that says that nature in the city is essential to maintaining people’s health and sanity, and to providing leisure opportunities for workers who cannot travel outside the city.” These squirrels were possibly the only wildlife the workers would ever see.

Read more about city squirrels at Gizmodo. Photo of a fry-loving squirrel via Serious Eats.

StreetGhosts
Boomeranged Metaphors

From Street View Pics to Real-Life Ghosts

Italian artist Paolo Cirio prints life-sized pictures of people found on Google’s Street View and posts them at the same spot where they were taken. By taking virtual identities out of the digital world and giving them a new life in three-dimensional reality, he reopens the debate about digital privacy.

Google permanently stores the digital pictures taken by the Google Car online. Cirio considers his “ghosts” victims, as he explains: “These companies keep this data forever, even when we die. And they commercially exploit it”.

To learn more, follow him during a night of work in some of Brooklyn’s busiest intersections on Motherboard.

frisky whisky atomic radioactive
Fake-for-Real

Frisky Whisky: Radioactive Booze from the Atomic Age

Every bottle tested by a geiger counter! No doubt one of the stranger beverages from yesteryear, Frisky Whiskey promises that it’s “the world’s first whiskey to be aged by atomic materials. Its thirty day process is equivalent to 40 years of standardized 19th century aging.” First, and hopefully last. This dubious drink is demonstrates how marketers jump on new scientific trends as a way to give their products an edge – even if that ‘edge’ is imaginary.

EDIT: Alas, too bad to be true. It’s a fake. Guess we’ll have to go back to drinking radium-infused water from the office Revigator.

Via Retronaut.

Jean-Marc Cote illustration 1899 uncirculated, kitchen in 2000, published in Isaac Asimov's Futuredays 1986
Food Technology

Bizarre Retro-Futuristic Visions of Meat

Turns out that people have been concerned about the realities of meat consumption for quite a while. This is an illustration produced in 1899 by Jean-Marc Cote. The illustrations were made for a company that went out of  business before they could be circulated, but a set was discovered much later and reproduced in a book with commentary by Isaac Asimov. Cote envisioned the kitchen of the year 2000, where food is produced in a chemistry lab rather than in a traditional kitchen.

Click through to see more retro-futuristic predictions, including a miniature factory farm and fields sprouting with “fat plants” and “meat beets”.

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