Tag: Image-Consumption

P1180908
Food Technology

Meat & Greet Workshop Report

Last week a fine selection of in-vitro meat connoisseurs gathered during a ‘Meat & Greet’ workshop at Eindhoven University of Technology. We exchanged perspectives, shared knowledge and explored speculative design opportunities of In-Vitro Meat with a philosopher, biologist, design students, and a documentary director. Below are some snapshots.

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chips
Food Technology

How Food Scientists Engineer the “Bliss Point” in Junk Food

Over at the New York Times, a recent article exposes the clever and surprisingly immoral ways the food industry manufactures foods to rival hard drugs for their addictive potential. Well worth the read, the article discusses “designer sodium”, the genesis of the ideal kid’s lunch, and the search for the morphine-like “bliss point” in soda. One scientist’s description of Cheetos, in particular, highlighted the extraordinary detail that goes into what we see as a normal, familiar food:

“This,” Witherly said, “is one of the most marvelously constructed foods on the planet, in terms of pure pleasure.” He ticked off a dozen attributes of the Cheetos that make the brain say more. But the one he focused on most was the puff’s uncanny ability to melt in the mouth. “It’s called vanishing caloric density,” Witherly said. “If something melts down quickly, your brain thinks that there’s no calories in it . . . you can just keep eating it forever.” Read more

paint_with_meat
Food Technology

Eating In Vitro: Meat Paint

Beyond imitating known meat products like steaks and hamburgers, in-vitro meat could give rise to entirely new food products and dining habits.

Paint with meat! is a speculative product for children of 5-10 years old. It allows them to prepare their own meat dish in a very creative, fun and safe way: by painting! The meat paint lets children put some extra effort into their meal, which makes the dinner more valuable and meaningful again. By painting their own meal children get more affinity with their food and are therefore more willing to eat it.

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learn to love your food
Food Technology

Pick Pig – Name Pig – Love Pig – Eat Pig

In a time of all-horse hamburgers and E. coli outbreaks, food provenance has become a huge issue. Consumers are becoming increasingly aware of the lack of traceability within the food industry. Often, shoppers have to rely on packaging to tell the truth – which it often doesn’t. What if the origin of a food could be proven at the most basic level?

While some may struggle with harsh reality that an animal must die for us to eat meat, Yorkshire Meats has seen this as an opportunity to provide people in the UK with full traceability and accountability. Through their Adopt-a-Pig scheme consumers can track their pig’s life from start to finish, developing a relationship with the animal whilst also being aware of exactly how and where the pork they eat has been raised.

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retouching models to make them appear fatter
Anthropomorphobia

Reverse Retouching: Fattening Up Too-Thin Models

In a darkly ironic reversal of its normal role, Photoshop is now being deployed to make models look more fleshy than they actually are. In part spurred on by the impossible beauty standards that Photoshop has made commonplace, models have become so adept at self-starvation that magazine editors have to use software to make them look healthier.

Former Cosmo editor Leah Hardy recently described the “reverse-retouching” that occurred under her tenure:

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Image-Consumption

Happy Meat

The Happy Meat project combines the basic principles of the meat-industry and the toy-industry in an uncanny hybrid.

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Screen shot 2012-12-12 at 12.26.40 PM
Hypernature

Genetic Screening for Christmas Trees

If you’ve turned to plastic Christmas trees because the real ones leave piles of needles behind, science is working to bring live conifers back into your holidays. A $1.3 million project in…

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Next Nature
Biomimicmarketing

How ‘Green’ is Green Cotton?

The latest trend in fashion is organic clothing. These clothes are made with organic materials and raised or grown by organic agricultural standards. Examples of such organic materials are cotton, jute, silk, ramie or wool. These materials are grown without herbicides, pesticides or any genetically modified seeds.

Intuitively we expect these organic clothes to be more environmental friendly and sustainable than polyester textiles, until you realize the natural color of cotton is not green, but brown.

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child pate
Anthropomorphobia

Liver Pie Made for (Not from) Children

Everyday Anthropomophobia: This summer in Norway I discovered it is normal to put images of happy children on your liver pie product. I asked a Norwegian friend about this packaging and we…

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Food Technology

Inside the Fastfood “Photokitchen”

Why does your food look different in advertising than it does in the store? A Canadian McDonald’s marketing manager tries to answer this common question with a behind-the-scenes videos, providing insight into…

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