Tag: Information Decoration

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Image-Consumption

Teasing the Internet of Things

The Internet of Things (IoT) products range from smart frying pans that check if the food is cooked, to wearables that track your health. When there is such abundance of areas where IoT could be applied, several ridiculous, unnecessary products are inevitable. Rehabstudio, a creative technology company, draws attention to this pitfall with a parody blog called The Internet of Useless Things.

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Brand Territory

Minimalist Effect in the Maximalist Market

In the 21st century, where we are surrounded by huge amounts of data, it was almost inevitable to turn design preferences towards simplicity and less information overload. With this in mind, in 2010 the multidisciplinary design consultancy Antrepo Team created a project named Minimalist Effect in the Maximalist Market. Their goal is to meditate on the most desirable and simplistic packaging and labeling of well-known supermarket products.

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Fake-for-Real

The Candle of the Future

If the pandemic of bees will continue, among the various damages this will bring, there might be the disappearance of wax. Luckily we will still be able to have candlelight dinner with My New Flame. This unconventional centerpiece, by London based designer Moritz Waldemeyer, uses LED technology to faithfully recreate the experience of light from the ancient past. Thanks to an algorithm that makes sure the sequence of movements never repeats, My New Flame mimics the natural behavior of fire accurately.

The digital candle is less polluting and more sustainable than smoldering old fashioned wax candles, but not for our wallet, as it costs $600. If you can afford it, we suggest you to use it to create the perfect atmosphere for a virtual dinner.

Source: The Creators Project

smartphone
Information Decoration

When Was the Last Time you Were Bored?

Since we own it, the smartphone has became an extension of our body. At the first hint of boredom throughout the day, we instinctively grab it and start scrolling social media pages, typing instant messages, checking the mail, or playing the latest game. In the Society of the Simulation in which we are living there is no room for ennui, we don’t experience a moment of mental non-operational time anymore.

Recent studies found that, on a daily basis, we check the smartphone 150 times and spend an average of 2 hours and 57 minutes on mobile devices.

To get us rethink our relationship with technology, New Tech City launched the Bored and Brilliant: The Lost Art Of Spacing Out project. The idea is to ask people to measure their smartphone use with an app called Moment and then take some conscious steps to limit the digital interactions. The challenge will take place the first week of February, but you can already sign up.
Are you willing to stop the constant brain stimulation and let yourself get bored?

Source: NPR

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Information Decoration

WikiGalaxy

WikiGalaxy, by French engineering student Owen Cornec, is an interactive visualization of Wikipedia entries as a galaxy of stars, that transforms the online encyclopedia into a digital space map of articles.

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cars
Designed-by-Evolution

Blaming Car Technology for Dumb Drivers

We increasingly depend on car technology designed to make driving easier and safer. Therefore, can be said that these improvements are creating less-skilled drivers?

“Technological crutches like GPS are making us not only worse drivers – they could also be making us stupid. Technology wasn’t supposed to work that way. Manufacturers have supported drivers with power steering, cruise control, antilock brakes and electronic stability controls. Then they gave us sophisticated on-board computers that power car entertainment systems and fine-tune our cars’ performance on the go. Today we drive sleek, aerodynamic vehicles with more computing power than early Space Shuttles.”

We’ve already seen GPS lead people into some ridiculous situations.
But can we blame the GPS for this, when we follow directions that are totally contrary to good sense?

Read more on BBC Future

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Augmented-Bodies

Listening to Wi-Fi

Modern technologies can give deaf people the ability to hear again. With hearing aid people who lost their hearing can instantly hear the lost sounds again they were missing. Frank Swain was one of these people who retrieved their hearing again, thanks to this. Not only can he hear all the regular sounds around us, but also the invisible Wi-Fi signals.

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Ruriden
Digital-Presence

High-Tech Cemetery

Japanese people use to turn to technology for solutions to many of the issues of life, and now death too.

In Japan, a crowded country with a fast-ageing society, there is a shortage of final resting places, especially in the big cities. With a population expected to shrink by nearly 30 million people over the next 50 years, the funerals and graves market is very alive. The Ruriden cemetery, in Tokyo, is a hi-tech solution – multi-storey graveyards.

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