Tag: Information Decoration

Commute
Humane-Technology

Analogue vs Digital: Still Antisocial

Some modern thinkers argue that new technology is making us antisocial. The digital network is with us, on us, all the time. Distracting us from the analog life and each other. But how much different is reading the news from your mobile device to being immersed in the old-school newspaper? The people at left are not social at all, reading the news via the screens of their time.

From the Analogue vs Digital Memory Game

GPS
Digital-Presence

Analogue vs Digital: Never Lost with GPS

Before global positioning systems, we all used maps. And they could be very annoying. Stopping along the way because you didn’t remember which turn you should take, the clumsy sizes and hard way to fold it back. Never mind the arguments on map reading skills… Whew! It all belongs to the past. Maps and satellite navigation devices are the best invention! But don’t lose your mind.

The results of people blindly following digital directions into large bodies of water, the wrong way on a busy road, and yes, even trees, show that we might have all become just a little too reliant on those helpful voices that guide us along our way. From the Analogue vs Digital Memory Game.

Matter
Digital-Presence

Analogue vs Digital: Basic Parts of Matter

Do you think you are made from bits and bytes? Stop playing video games and spend some more time offline! Both atoms and bits are basic parts of matter. An atom is the smallest unit of any chemical element, still recognizable building block. A bit is the smallest unit of information, a symbol or signal that can have one or two values. Information technology represents these values as 0 and 1. Remember: you are made of atoms; your video game is made of zeros and ones.

From the Analogue vs Digital Memory Game.

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Humane-Technology

Mini’s Augmented Reality Driving Goggles

Always fascinated by Iron Man’s helmet that provides Tony Stark with augmented reality information? Mini cars are working on something similar, minus the attack mode. Now owned by BMW, the popular car brand is developing augmented reality goggles that enhance the driving experience.

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Library
Digital-Presence

Analogue vs Digital: Information Storage

In search for information, people once used to go to libraries. Fortunately, there were librarians helping you to find the information you were looking for. Although libraries are not (yet) extinct, the internet is trying to take over.

The world’s biggest online search engine data centers are enormous. Continuously they process all information to make sure you can access it anytime, anywhere. They are the brains of Mr. Google, the librarian that finds your information in less than a second.

From the Analogue vs Digital Memory Game.

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Image-Consumption

Teasing the Internet of Things

The Internet of Things (IoT) products range from smart frying pans that check if the food is cooked, to wearables that track your health. When there is such abundance of areas where IoT could be applied, several ridiculous, unnecessary products are inevitable. Rehabstudio, a creative technology company, draws attention to this pitfall with a parody blog called The Internet of Useless Things.

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Brand Territory

Minimalist Effect in the Maximalist Market

In the 21st century, where we are surrounded by huge amounts of data, it was almost inevitable to turn design preferences towards simplicity and less information overload. With this in mind, in 2010 the multidisciplinary design consultancy Antrepo Team created a project named Minimalist Effect in the Maximalist Market. Their goal is to meditate on the most desirable and simplistic packaging and labeling of well-known supermarket products.

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Fake-for-Real

The Candle of the Future

If the pandemic of bees will continue, among the various damages this will bring, there might be the disappearance of wax. Luckily we will still be able to have candlelight dinner with My New Flame. This unconventional centerpiece, by London based designer Moritz Waldemeyer, uses LED technology to faithfully recreate the experience of light from the ancient past. Thanks to an algorithm that makes sure the sequence of movements never repeats, My New Flame mimics the natural behavior of fire accurately.

The digital candle is less polluting and more sustainable than smoldering old fashioned wax candles, but not for our wallet, as it costs $600. If you can afford it, we suggest you to use it to create the perfect atmosphere for a virtual dinner.

Source: The Creators Project