Tag: Manufactured Animals

Manufactured Animals

Plastic Exoskeletons for Turtles

Turtles love jellyfish. Unfortunately, they often mistake plastic bags for their favorite food. According to the United Nations Environment Program each year 100,000 marine mammals, including sea turtles, die from ocean pollution and ingestion or entanglement in marine debris; waste directly or indirectly disposed in oceans, rivers and other waterways. Antonio Esparza designed the TurtleBag: a 3D printable exoskeleton to help turtles distinguish plastic bags from jellyfish and extend their lifespan.

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Animal Meditations Sloth Tree
Back to the Tribe

Animal Guided Mediation

Are you practicing meditation? If you do that as a habit, you might already be experiencing the wide-known benefits of it. Meditation brings peace and love to our mind and soul. It’s good for relaxation and it helps us to be more connected with the world and ourselves. And it’s about to get even better.

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Manufactured Animals

Robo-Bee Pollinated a Japanese Lily

A video of a robotic bee pollinating a flower (looking more like Loopin’ Louie spinning off the board game and hitting a flower) recently caught our attention. What at first sight might look like a silly viral video, could be an important step in the survival of bees. To save us humans from a future without honey and pollinating crops by hand, we need to save the bees. These insect-sized drones could actually play a major role in their survival.

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Manufactured Animals

Cyborg Dragonfly for Special Service

In the episode ‘Hated in the Nation’ from British television anthology Black Mirror, a private tech company unleashes a group of robotic honeybees in response to the extinction of real honeybees. It wouldn’t been glorifying in any way, if the show hadn’t turned to a darker side of these drone insects: besides from transferring pollen between flowers and plants to restore ecological imbalance, these robobees set out to kill people. Fact is, this story has nothing to do with robotic killerbees. But what if we told you that a biomedical solutions company is developing a system for insects to wear, allowing engineers to steer them remotely?

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Animals sense tsunami
Hypernature

Animal Tsunami Alerts from Space

Since ancient times people have believed that animals have the ability to sense and anticipate earthquakes, tsunami or other natural disasters. And there’s evidence to support this belief. Back in 2005 when a tsunami hit many countries in the Indic Ocean there were many reports of odd behavior in wild and domestic animals and there were almost no animal victims in the aftermath. Now, there is a way to “borrow” this mysterious sense using tracking tags and the International Space Station (ISS).

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BladeRanger Drones and Robots solar panels cleaning
Wild Systems

Drones and Robots Co-Work in Solar Farms

Every day in the Arava region in southern Israel a group of drones, called pelicans, carry solar panels cleaning robots, called plecos (like the fish known for their ability to clean algae from aquariums), at work. It could be a story from our What’s Flying There? book, instead it is a project by BladeRanger, an Israeli company specialized in managing autonomous robots with unmanned aerial vehicles. Their first application is for the inspection and cleaning of photovoltaic installations.

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Lilou the San Francisco Airport Pig
Manufactured Animals

Lilou the Airport Pig Will Soothe Your Travel

If you happen to be at San Francisco International Airport on the hectic Holiday time, LiLou can help you alleviate the stress. She wears fancy ballerina skirt, has bright painted nails and an officer hat. Her winning personality and sense of fun make her a perfect match for the position. What may come as a surprise, LiLou is a Juliana-breed pig.

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Dog eating cake
Manufactured Animals

A Piece of Cake for Your Dog

Your dog may prefer rare steak to cake but his stomach is actually suited for the latter as well. Farming introduction made dogs eat as much wheat and millet that they evolved extra copies of starch-digesting genes about 7.000 years ago. That helped them stay on our side even though life conditions changed.

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