Tag: Media Schemas

Media Schemas

We Are What We Like

Every time we use our PC we leave behind lots of personal information that computers use to understand our personality and what we like, far better than our own mother, family or friends.

According to a study conducted by researchers at the University of Cambridge and Stanford University, our computer – equipped with a list of things we “Like” on Facebook – knows us more than our kith and kin (and probably even better than we know ourselves).

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Exploring the Society of Simulations with “Her”: Nextnatural Movie

What about a movie night? A new nextnatural film is on the big screen! We are talking about “Her”, a science-fiction romance written and directed by Spike Jonze, set in a not too distant  future. Part of the movie’s charm is just how meticulously Jonze has imagined and constructed a future Los Angeles: its smoggy skies, its glittering skyscrapers, its efficient transit system.

The movie tells the story of the modern age love relationship between, Theodore (played by Joaquin Phoenix), a lonely man who writes love letters for people with difficulties expressing their feeling, and Samantha (Scarlett Johansson). Samantha, it should be mentioned, is an intelligent computer-operating system.

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Boomeranged Metaphors

Belief System Meets Operating System

The image above depicts two seemingly Indian men sitting in front of what looks like an improvised temple or shrine for the hindu goddess Saraswati. What makes the image curious, is that the façade of the temple is constructed from a large-scale print of a Facebook Wall, dedicated to the deity. Do we have a Boomeranged Metaphor here or is it time to coin a new term: the Reincarnated Interface?

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kano computer kit

Assemble Your Own Computer

Buy a computer for $99 and put it together in 107 seconds is now possible! Based on simple steps, physical computing, and play, Kano is the computer anyone can make, as affirmed in its slogan.

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Pixel Nostalgia Leads to Digital Pointillism

For years, we have assisted in the war of megapixels. Smartphones, cameras and tablets do battle offering the most powerful, detailed and high definition displays and pictures. Nevertheless, around the web the opposite trend is spreading: returning to the digital image essence, the pixel. Through an app (I Pixel U) is it possible to transform our snapshots in dots, choosing the subject to blur and leaving the rest intact. It’s a sort of nostalgic action that reminds us at the same time of the painting technique of Pointillism and the oldest video games. Progressive Nostalgia, indeed!

Innovative Nostalgia


As technology progresses we constantly have to adapt ourselves to new gadgets, yet occasionally, we need a gadget that feeds on our nostalgic sensibilities.

Miss the soothing clacking of typewriter keys? Long for satisfying clang of a carriage return? The iTypewriter, created by industrial designer Austin Yang, adds the old-fashioned typewriter feeling to your iPad, allowing you to relive those Mad Men days, or ensure that everyone in the library hates you by the time you hit ‘send’.

Amazon in Rugeley for the Financial Times Magazine

World’s Worst Job? Being a Human Robot at Amazon’s Fulfillment Center

Amazon.com’s fulfillment center in Rugeley, England, is a sterile kingdom where the algorithm is king – and humans do their best to perform its bidding. Workers’ every movement is dictated by a tracking algorithm, which can send them on trips of up to 24 kilometers per day on the quest for packages. The silence is total. Workers can be fired for talking, even as smiling cardboard cutouts remind them that “this is the best job I’ve ever had!”.

With zero-hour contracts – and jobs that evaporate from one day to the next – workers are treated more like cogs than humans. According to photojournalist Ben Roberts, who chronicled the Rugeley center in Amazon Unpacked, “the only reason Amazon doesn’t actually replace them with robots is they’ve yet to find a machine that can handle so many different sized packages.” It’s dismal proof that if we don’t domesticate technology, it ends up domesticating us.

Read more at Fast Company.