Tag: Microbial Factories

Rothko
Microbial Factories

Rothko in Salts

Located in northern China Shanxi province, this dreamy landscape, Xiechi Lake, is consider by some to be China’s dead sea. This 500 million years old saline lake, on which a human could easily float, randomly changes colour as a result of extreme heat. It is the multiplication of bacteria, or algal bloom, that “paints” the lake with these peculiar colours. Tints vary along magenta, green and yellow gradients, giving a Rothko-like appearance to the scenery, and making it our peculiar image of the week. Via NatGeo.

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sandra rey eco coin award
Microbial Factories

ECO Coin Award Interviews: Sandra Rey

The world is changing and it’s important that we evolve with it. The ECO Coin Award is our way of recognizing innovations and initiatives which help us adapt to our next nature. The nominees are all aiming to create a more humane and sustainable future for us all. Now, in the lead-up to the announcement of this year’s winner, we’re interviewing each of the three finalists to learn about their values, insights and visions for the future. This week, we spoke to Sandra Rey, founder of Glowee, nominated in recognition of her work to harness bioluminescence as a new light source.

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DNA
Microbial Factories

Bacteria Are the New Hard Drives

DNA is the densest known storage medium in the universe. It can store immense amounts of data in a very tiny amount of space. To give some perspective, these building blocks of life can hold 1,000,000,000,000,000,000 (one quintillion) bytes of information in a cubic millimeter. That is why researchers, from Harvard to Microsoft, are looking for ways to leverage this incredible resource.

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members
Interview Lining Yao
Next Nature

Interview: Lining Yao, Interaction Designer and Maker of Novel Materials

Real innovations are high tech but analogic, they are created by mixing biology, genetics and design to save energy and resources. This is the concept behind Lining Yao’s work, Chinese interaction designer and maker of novel materials and interfaces. She recently completed her PhD at Tangible Media Group, MIT Media Lab in Boston, where she focused on pushing Human Computer Interaction towards Human Material Interaction, and she is now Assistant Professor at HCII Institute at Carnegie Mellon University.

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bacteria shown in petri dish by hand in white glove
Microbial Factories

Bacteria Use Electronic Messaging

Did you ever think about how bacteria life could look like? Thanks to modern technologies, we are now able to research bacteria social behavior, which seems quite familiar. Scientists found out that bacteria use a universal language that helps to invite foreign workers to help build complex multicultural cities in order to inhabit the planet together.

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Guided Growth

Fungal Futures: the Mushrooms Utopia

In 2005, in his book Mycelium Running, American mycologist Paul Stamets predicted that mushrooms would help save the world. Twelve years later, several scientists and innovative entrepreneurs are using mushrooms to run their researches, businesses and dreams. Until Sunday February 12, you can learn more about the role of fungal micro-organisms at Fungal Futures exhibition in Enschede, The Netherlands. Even Stamets would be astonished by what a group of artists and designers can make nowadays with mushrooms.

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Waterbike
Microbial Factories

The Water-Cleaning Bike

Would you like to go for a bike ride on the water? Brazilian artist Ivan Henriques developed a bike that enables you to do just that. But there is more, while you are cycling merrily in the lake, it simultaneously purifies a trail of water after you.

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Swipe and wipe with toilet paper for your smartphone.
Microbial Factories

Toilet Paper for Your Smartphone

Usually when you cross the border or when your flight lands, you’ll receive a welcoming text message that informs you about roaming charges, and maybe sends you a code to get free WiFi access. If you are planning to travel to Tokyo’s Narita International Airport anytime soon, expect to find this information on a roll of tiny toilet paper that you can simultaneously use to disinfect your phone.

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