Tag: Officegarden


Logo landscape

As you walk through the corporate jungle you notice that it is a hectic place, but sometimes it can be quiet and peaceful. Then you’ll see pumas next to crocodiles and bunny chasing raging bulls.

Helmut Smits (2005) -landscape


Engineered Bacteria heal Cracks in Walls

Researchers have designed bacteria that can produce a special glue to knit together cracks in concrete structures.

Technews Daily reports the genetically modified microbes have been engineered to swim down fine cracks in concrete and once at the bottom produce a mixture of calcium carbonate and a bacterial glue. The building is “knitted” back together as the glue combines with the filamentous bacterial cells and hardens to the same strength as the surrounding concrete.

The bacterium tweaked by the researchers is called Bacillus subtilis and is commonly found in soil. Accordingly, the research team calls its building-healing agent “BacillaFilla.” Its spores start germinating only when they make contact with concrete – triggered by the very specific pH of the material – and they have a built-in self-destruct gene that prevents them from proliferating away from the concrete target.

Via MSNBC News. Thanks Jan van der Asdonk.


Newspaper Wood

How to upcycle old newspapers? Mieke Meijer (a.o.) from Vij5 took a jar of glue and started imitating tree rings. “The product surprisingly mimics the quality of real wood” she states. Read more


Are Mushrooms the New Plastic?

Mushroom based plastics? Designer Eben Bayer must have eaten too much of the wondrous chanterelles perhaps? No seriously, the man is turning his vision into a reality with an utterly–innovative–fungus–grown–plastics–packaging–material.

Welcome in the 21th century folks! Yet we couldn’t help noticing that Eben in his TED talk presents a very traditional, static idea of nature. Amazing that a guy who grows plastics from mushrooms gives a talk so deprived of next nature thinking (rather than seeing nature as static, we should perceive it as a dynamic force that changes along with us).

Hence, we can’t help but wonder what Eben thinks of the bugs that eat plastic – rest a sure, we applaud him nonetheless for his innovative mushroom material.



No this is not some stellar system far away. What is it then? Lets make another picture, this time with the flashlight on…

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Adaptive Bloom

This interactive installation came out of the Postgraduate Certificate Course in Advanced Architectural Research of the Bartlett School of Architecture in London. Graduate Justin Goodyer created this responsive wall that originally was designed to be a décor as well as a performing artist in a dance performance. The wall would react to the dancers by letting its flowers bloom whenever they sense someone is near. Thus creating an interaction between performers and their surroundings.

In the video you can see the wall reacting on the public at the ‘Constructing Realities’ exposition that shows the best project of the postgraduate course.


Design Fiction – Medical Bill of the Future

According to this fictitious future medical bill almost every part of the human body will be repairable in 2028. Gut bacteria replacement, Bone tissue growth for skull repair, Airlift, Cryogenic brain protection.. the list is lustrous. Yet, the scenario also wittingly shows how technological progress may have a price of technological dependence: The emancipation from bodily constraints is traded for a social-psychological dependence. The things we design end up designing us.

Zoom in on the full image for the creepy details. Via Wired. Todd Tankersley was the photographer. Aaron Rowe was the writer. Thanks Stephan.