Tag: Organized-Networks

Fake Nature

Antenna Tree Mast Safari

This picture was taken in Zambia by Sarah Los (NL) while on wildlife safari. Every fairly trained “NextNature spotter” should be able to distinguish the cellphone-tree masts from old-nature trees. But that’s odd; there are three of them in a row and all different species!? Does every cellular network provider plant its own tree family? It surely looks like a competition. Future designs are expected to look better, taller and greener.

Let us do a quick jungle safari ourselves. Read more

Google datacenters

Energy-aware Internet-routing

Google datacenters
Data-hungry companies like Google, Microsoft and Amazon could reduce their energy consumption with 40% by rerouting data to locations where electricity prices are lowest on a particular day. A smart routing algorithm could take advantage of daily and hourly fluctuations in electricity costs across the country (US) perhaps even the world. Further it could weigh up the physical distance needed to route information (it is more expensive to move data over greater distances) against the likely cost savings from reduced energy use. Energy prices fluctuate daily (changes in supply, consumer demand, fuel price hikes), even among geographically close locations. It is the outcome of research done by PhD student Asfandyar Qureshi and colleagues at MIT.

Google recently built a datacenter in Belgium that relies entirely on ambient cooling — on days when the weather gets too warm, the center’s servers are simply shut down. The energy-aware Internet-routing scheme is an extension of this idea says Bruce Maggs, vice president of research at Akamai. Data distribution alone will not be able to do the trick; servers need to use substantially less power when idle than when fully running. Further he remarks: “The paper is not about saving energy but about saving cost, although there are some ways to do both. You have to hope that those are aligned.” 

Via: technologyreview.com | Related: Search Engine | Energy Consumption shown on Power Plant | Datafountain | Power Aware Cord

Back to the Tribe

Augmented Phone Browsing

This video shows the first beta version of TwittARound – an augmented reality Twitter viewer on the iPhone 3Gs. It shows live tweets around your location on the horizon. Because of the video see-through effect you see where the tweet comes from and how far away it is.

The app does something similar as layar(.com)launched in Amsterdam (NL) June 17th –, a phone interface that puts a content layer over the phone camera’s videoscreen to locate the nearest toilet, bar, supermarket, bank and other search categories.

Though we still trust our natural eyes and ears; with tools like these, we have but to reach in our pockets to look ahead and see what is coming. The apps are not predicting the future yet, but I am pretty sure we will have to get back on that soon.

via: i.document.m05.de (thanks @droombos) | Related: On the Road | Avatar Machine

Food Technology

Four environmental ‘heresies’

TED talk by Steward Brand – the man who helped usher in the environmental movement in the 1960s and ’70s – has been rethinking his positions on cities, nuclear power, genetic modification and geo-engineering. Buckle up for some environmental heresies.

Boomeranged Metaphors

China limits use of ‘virtual’ currencies


SHANGHAI — China made public on Tuesday regulations aimed at cracking down on the use of virtual currencies amid worries that a huge underground economy was developing out of the country’s online gaming community.

The rules, issued jointly by the Ministry of Commerce and the Ministry of Culture in Beijing, could deal a blow to the country’s fast-growing online gaming industry.

Beijing said the regulations would curtail trading in virtual currencies, prevent online gambling and restrict virtual currency from being exchanged for cash or used to buy real goods.

Among other things, Chinese officials have worried that online currencies could ultimately serve as an alternative to China’s official currency, the renminbi, and have an impact on the country’s financial system.

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Tweets go Bubble

Minsh is an underwater 3D navigable world where each fish represents a Twitter user. The concept behind this world is that the social behaviour of fish will represent what people are talking about online. In the world of Minsh, people writing about a given subject find themselves swimming in the same school. When a person updates his or her Twitter status, the fish swims away to join fish with similar thoughts on their minds.

Web 2.0 still seems unable to escape parodying and/or mimicking old nature.

Boomeranged Metaphors

Games Become Jobs: Gold Farming in China

Chinese workers slaying monsters to earn gold for western consumers. It sounds surreal, but it is a far from virtual reality for the so-called ‘gold farmers’, who are working in 10-hour shifts to help players gain levels, and wealth, in online roleplaying games like World of Warcraft.

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Visitors of the British amusement park Alton Towers can have themselves wristbanded and RFID tracked in order to buy a “personalised” DVD at the end of their visit. Precomposed videomaterial is mixed with CCTV footage, featuring the wristband-wearer, friends and family having a great personalized collective experience day out. Watch some video examples here.


Mark the day that the British started paying for their own surveillance camera footage!

via: boingboing.net | related: CCTV Total World Domination | Smart Forests EWAN


Controlling the Uncontrollable

i love china
It is a home to crawlers, virusses, search engines, gamers, spammers, chatters, twitters, bloggers, worms and spiders. If calling it alive goes too far, it’s still safe to say that the internet forms a nature of its own. Would the new American president have won the elections if he had ignored its tentacles? How many people would be out of a job if it seized to exist? Internet’s garden is blooming like never seen before, yet some people only enjoy gardens without the weeds.

Article by Michael Bristow, published at news.bbc.co.uk.

China is using an increasing number of paid “internet commentators” in a sophisticated attempt to control public opinion. These commentators are used by government departments to scour the internet for bad news – and then negate it. They post comments on websites and forums that spin bad news into good in an attempt to shape public opinion. Read more