Tag: Physical-computing

Anthropomorphobia

Artificial Intelligence Learns to Smell

Did you ever think about how artificial intelligence will deal with smell in the future? A group of 22 teams of computer scientists came up with a set of algorithms able to forecast the scent of different molecules based on their chemical composition. With such algorithms you might be able to know exactly what people will smell in the future.

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Sharing thoughts
Intimate Technology

Will We Share .thought Files?

Don’t we all wish to look into someone else’s mind every once in a while? With the evolving technique called EEG, electroencephalography, we can measure brain activity and ultimately even read the brain. The newest inventions are becoming more and more portable, ready to be implemented into our everyday life.

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Intimate Technology

Caress of the Gaze

If technology transformed animals into people; is technology perhaps also capable of changing people back into animals? Architect and interaction designer Behnaz Farahi envisions an interactive 3D printed outfit that can detect and respond to the gaze of the other, and respond accordingly with life-like behavior. Rest assure, we are the primitives of a next nature.

Thanks Sanne.

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Made-to-debate

Hacking And Controlling Cars Remotely

Two American hackers, Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek, during the last two years have been working on hacking cars to takeover full control of vehicles. At the beginning of the project in 2013, their hacks had limitations: they had to sit in the back of the car with their laptops hooked up with wires to the cars central nervous system. Today the two hackers have gone wireless, operating over the internet.

This was possible because car manufactures are implementing smart inter-connective technologies and integrating WiFi hot spots into their products. The only thing a hacker needs to know is the car IP address to take full control over the car, anytime anywhere. “From an attacker’s perspective, it’s a super nice vulnerability”Miller says. “This is what everyone who thinks about car security has worried about for years. This is a reality”.

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Read more at: Wired

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Digital-Presence

Googles Natural Tracking Technology

Search giant Google is developing a new interaction sensor that can track movements with great accuracy using radar technology. It’s only the size of a small computer chip and can be inserted into everyday objects and things we use daily.

Watch the video for a guaranteed moment of amazement. If the Google’s Soli technology final implementation will be as precise as the demonstration, we may soon all be making magical gestures to interact with our digital devices. And the best thing: it will feel entirely natural.

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Wild Systems

Hunger Games for Robots

As technology develops and introduces more complex wild systems every day, it is inevitable that some jobs are taken over by our creations. How would you feel if robots inherited ethical complications of existence? This is the question that Berlin-based audiovisual artist Martin Reiche seeks to answer, by pitting robots against each other in a deadly fight for resources.

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Humane-Technology

3D Holography: the Future of Medicine

Although biomedical imaging technologies have been improved enough to show us 3D images of our insides, there are still technical problems associated with the current technology. A new company called EchoPixel might have an innovative solution with its interactive holographic viewer system True3D Viewer.

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Guided Growth

Hyperform: the Future of 3D Printing

“However, while 3D printers are becoming increasingly accessible and capable of rivalling the quality of professional equipment, they are still inherently limited by a small print volume, placing severe constraints on the type and scale of objects we can create.” Says designer Marcelo Coelho. With a very smart construction strategy in mind, Coelho developed together with designer and technologist Skylar Tibbits an algorithmic software named Hyperform.

The algorithm can transforms a needed form – possibly bigger than the printer’s measurement reach – into an origami-like chain structure, which can be unfolded into the bigger final product. Hyperform makes it possible to print bigger forms in a single piece, while the ordinary printers print different parts separately and assemblies them later. “Hyperform encodes assembly information into the actual parts, so there is no need for a separate assembly instruction sheet and parts don’t need to be individually labeled and sorted” says Coelho.

Source: Core77

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