Tag: Plastic Planet

Plastic Planet

The Plastic Problem #1: Biobased and Biodegradable Plastic

People involved into plastic matters predict that in the next thirty years the consumption of this particular and malleable material will go from the current 300-400 million tons to the double amount, at least. Plastic, or rather plastics were born from petroleum-derived polymers and had immediate success thanks to their mechanical and chemical properties and the low purchase cost.

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Electronic Gadget Cemetery in Ghana

We love buying shiny new gadgets every now and then, but have you ever wondered where your old device ends up when you get rid of it? Agbogbloshie in Ghana is one of the places where electronics, such as computers, mobile phones and televisions, go to die.

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Plastic Planet

Marketing the Oceans

Eco-friendly fashion is in vogue, evidenced by terms like “recycled-material” and “sustainable manufacturing” battered around as selling points for everything from sheets to shoes. So, despite how easy it is to hide the source of a material, when designers venture into this brand of lifestyle-fashion the incentive it to reveal, not mask, a product’s recycled roots. Take the new Adidas concept shoe, crafted with recycled materials gathered from the oceans.

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Plastivore – A Bird that Feeds on Plastic

Imagine humankind would magically disappear from the planet today. We would leave the ruins of cities, roads, cars and… plastics. Since its invention in 1907, plastic steadily worked its way into the geology of Earth. As plastics hardly break down they could survive humankind.

Artist Britt Duppen envisions that, in due time, new species might evolve that could feed on plastic. Her speculative ‘Plastivore’ bird (Latin for ‘plastic eater’, plasticio meaning ‘plastic’ or ‘food that contains particles of plastic’ and vorare meaning ‘to devour’) thrives on a diet of fungi and plastics.

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Led religion

In This Church We Only Take Credit Cards

“Credit cards only” at the Sanctuary of Caravaggio, in the province of Bergamo, Italy. A POS that allows devotees to turn on electric candles, book Masses and make donations to the church with credit card offerings. That must have seemed like a good idea to the Dean of the Sanctuary, that receive over two million of visitors every year.

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What if Humans Disappeared?

Life would normally continue with humans and their evolving surroundings, but this movie envisions what could happen if we would just disappear.

Humanity made a strong impact on the planet, but we should not underestimate the incredible power of nature. With our disappearance, animals that depend on us will suffer drastic population declines. At the same time, without human presence on Earth, some animal species that are close to extinction would suddenly grow in population. Most of our remains will decompose because of nature power initiated by fire, weeds and termites. The only thing that would remain of us would be our trash of plastic, chemicals and radioactive material. But of course the question is, why would we all of a sudden disappear?

Source: Asap SCIENCE


Using Shrimp Shell to Produce Bioplastics

Bugs are one of the most frequently imitated living species in science. Even the word “bug” is borrowed to describe software or hardware defects, spying devices or cult automobiles, such as the Volkswagen Beetle. The latest mimicry of these fascinating creatures has been developed by Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard. Researchers Javier Fernandez and Donald Ingber are inspired by the exoskeletons of bugs in order to produce sturdy, biodegradable plastics.

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The Candle of the Future

If the pandemic of bees will continue, among the various damages this will bring, there might be the disappearance of wax. Luckily we will still be able to have candlelight dinner with My New Flame. This unconventional centerpiece, by London based designer Moritz Waldemeyer, uses LED technology to faithfully recreate the experience of light from the ancient past. Thanks to an algorithm that makes sure the sequence of movements never repeats, My New Flame mimics the natural behavior of fire accurately.

The digital candle is less polluting and more sustainable than smoldering old fashioned wax candles, but not for our wallet, as it costs $600. If you can afford it, we suggest you to use it to create the perfect atmosphere for a virtual dinner.

Source: The Creators Project