Tag: Plastic Planet

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Designed-by-Evolution

Plastivore – A Bird that Feeds on Plastic

Imagine humankind would magically disappear from the planet today. We would leave the ruins of cities, roads, cars and… plastics. Since its invention in 1907, plastic steadily worked its way into the geology of Earth. As plastics hardly break down they could survive humankind.

Artist Britt Duppen envisions that, in due time, new species might evolve that could feed on plastic. Her speculative ‘Plastivore’ bird (Latin for ‘plastic eater’, plasticio meaning ‘plastic’ or ‘food that contains particles of plastic’ and vorare meaning ‘to devour’) thrives on a diet of fungi and plastics.

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Led religion
Image-Consumption

In This Church We Only Take Credit Cards

“Credit cards only” at the Sanctuary of Caravaggio, in the province of Bergamo, Italy. A POS that allows devotees to turn on electric candles, book Masses and make donations to the church with credit card offerings. That must have seemed like a good idea to the Dean of the Sanctuary, that receive over two million of visitors every year.

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Anthropocene

What if Humans Disappeared?

Life would normally continue with humans and their evolving surroundings, but this movie envisions what could happen if we would just disappear.

Humanity made a strong impact on the planet, but we should not underestimate the incredible power of nature. With our disappearance, animals that depend on us will suffer drastic population declines. At the same time, without human presence on Earth, some animal species that are close to extinction would suddenly grow in population. Most of our remains will decompose because of nature power initiated by fire, weeds and termites. The only thing that would remain of us would be our trash of plastic, chemicals and radioactive material. But of course the question is, why would we all of a sudden disappear?

Source: Asap SCIENCE

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Biomimicry

Using Shrimp Shell to Produce Bioplastics

Bugs are one of the most frequently imitated living species in science. Even the word “bug” is borrowed to describe software or hardware defects, spying devices or cult automobiles, such as the Volkswagen Beetle. The latest mimicry of these fascinating creatures has been developed by Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard. Researchers Javier Fernandez and Donald Ingber are inspired by the exoskeletons of bugs in order to produce sturdy, biodegradable plastics.

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IMG_5241
Fake-for-Real

The Candle of the Future

If the pandemic of bees will continue, among the various damages this will bring, there might be the disappearance of wax. Luckily we will still be able to have candlelight dinner with My New Flame. This unconventional centerpiece, by London based designer Moritz Waldemeyer, uses LED technology to faithfully recreate the experience of light from the ancient past. Thanks to an algorithm that makes sure the sequence of movements never repeats, My New Flame mimics the natural behavior of fire accurately.

The digital candle is less polluting and more sustainable than smoldering old fashioned wax candles, but not for our wallet, as it costs $600. If you can afford it, we suggest you to use it to create the perfect atmosphere for a virtual dinner.

Source: The Creators Project

C5
Hypermaterials

Bioplastic Made of Pressed Insect Shells

Coleoptera by Aagje Hoekstra is certainly not the last bio-based project at the Dutch Design Week, but is a very interesting one for sure. Aagje’s approach is aimed at an already industrially ‘used’ insect. In the Netherlands mealworms are bred for the animal food industry. The mealworm eventually becomes the mealworm beetle which dies three to four months after laying its eggs. As there’s no use for them anymore their bodies are thrown away. However the beetle’s armor contains the substance chitin which is eventually converted to chitosan. These ‘chitosan shields’ can be pressed on to each other to form a paper-thin material. We see quirky, though beautiful, looking artifacts as a result.

Are quirky artifacts the beginning of a large-scale transition from our plastic world to a hybrid of organisms? Will the industry continue where the arts halted, or are we still repulsed by the idea of fungi kitchen appliances and mealworm lamps? Perhaps next years DDW will tell.

This article was originally published on Next Nature Lab

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Fake-for-Real

Food To Eat With Your Eyes

Anything can be made” claims one of the many producer of plastic food.
In Japan, fake food industry represents a century of old crafting tradition and a multi billion business.

Restaurants proudly show inviting vitrines of hyper-realistic replicas of food and drinks. Why? Japanese like to “eat with their eyes”. But what is really entertaining about it lies behind the scene, where extremely fascinating production techniques have been developed over time to create the most amazing results.

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Designed-by-Evolution

Breaking Down Plastics with Bacteria

Following in 16-year old Daniel Burd’s footsteps, who developed a microorganism that can rapidly biodegrade plastic, high schoolers Miranda Wang and Jeanny Yao found a way to break down plastics using soil bacteria.

In this TED Talk the two Vancouver students explain how, on just a whim, they came across bacteria in the Fraser River capable of destroying plastics.
While it is exciting to have such young talents discovering plastic eating bacteria, should we fear the rising of a wild and unpredictable next nature?
Via TED