Tag: Plastic Planet


Bioplastic Made of Pressed Insect Shells

Coleoptera by Aagje Hoekstra is certainly not the last bio-based project at the Dutch Design Week, but is a very interesting one for sure. Aagje’s approach is aimed at an already industrially ‘used’ insect. In the Netherlands mealworms are bred for the animal food industry. The mealworm eventually becomes the mealworm beetle which dies three to four months after laying its eggs. As there’s no use for them anymore their bodies are thrown away. However the beetle’s armor contains the substance chitin which is eventually converted to chitosan. These ‘chitosan shields’ can be pressed on to each other to form a paper-thin material. We see quirky, though beautiful, looking artifacts as a result.

Are quirky artifacts the beginning of a large-scale transition from our plastic world to a hybrid of organisms? Will the industry continue where the arts halted, or are we still repulsed by the idea of fungi kitchen appliances and mealworm lamps? Perhaps next years DDW will tell.

This article was originally published on Next Nature Lab


Food To Eat With Your Eyes

Anything can be made” claims one of the many producer of plastic food.
In Japan, fake food industry represents a century of old crafting tradition and a multi billion business.

Restaurants proudly show inviting vitrines of hyper-realistic replicas of food and drinks. Why? Japanese like to “eat with their eyes”. But what is really entertaining about it lies behind the scene, where extremely fascinating production techniques have been developed over time to create the most amazing results.

Read more


Breaking Down Plastics with Bacteria

Following in 16-year old Daniel Burd’s footsteps, who developed a microorganism that can rapidly biodegrade plastic, high schoolers Miranda Wang and Jeanny Yao found a way to break down plastics using soil bacteria.

In this TED Talk the two Vancouver students explain how, on just a whim, they came across bacteria in the Fraser River capable of destroying plastics.
While it is exciting to have such young talents discovering plastic eating bacteria, should we fear the rising of a wild and unpredictable next nature?

Credit Card

Credit to Plastic

Gold, silver or platinum credit cards? In the end it’s all plastic!


Zero-Waste Grocery Store

A four-strong team of young women from Germany launch a shopping revolution: with their crowdfunded supermarket Original Unverpackt they’re going to ban disposable packages. The shop will open its doors in late summer in Berlin Kreuzberg.

Read more


Nature Learned to Turn Plastic into Rocks

Scientists have found rocks formed from plastic on Hawaiian shores. This discovery indicates that plastic litter can merge with natural elements, forming a new material: plastiglomerate.

This fusion could become part of the geological record, marking the Anthropocene and the human impact on the Earth’s ecosystems.
Looking on the bright side, plastic being able to fuse with shell and rocks could be exploited for the creation of artificial coral reefs.

Nature always finds a way, if she can’t get rid of plastic, she turn it into rocks.

Read more on Science Mag

Food Technology

The Bottle of The Future is an Edible Blob

Like in a microcosm, what if we could drink from a giant drop of water?
The bottle of the future has the shape of a soft, hygienic, biodegradable and edible blob, where the liquid is kept together by a solution of brown algae and calcium chloride.

Ooho is a project from the Spanish trio Skipping Rocks Lab that represents a brilliant  solution to the major international issue of plastic bottle waste.

Read more


Building a Boat with Marine Plastic Trash

Cleaning beaches and oceans from trash by transforming it in something useful and entitled to float on water.
A young man from Lamu, Kenya, collected tourists’ disused slippers and seaborne plastic bottles and threw them back to the ocean in the form of a boat.

Even if the ship doesn’t look seaworthy, it is a clear statement of the impact of plastic accumulation in marine environments. Peculiar object of the week.

Source: AfriGadget

Related post: Essay: Plastic Planet


Plastic Pollution Solution

It seemed an impossible challenge to clean the ocean from plastic pollution, until now. Dutch Technology student Boyan Slat says he may have found a way to remove disposed from seawater. He has a solution to clean oceans in five years, and make it profitable.

Read more