Tag: Plastic Planet

Fake-for-Real

The Candle of the Future

If the pandemic of bees will continue, among the various damages this will bring, there might be the disappearance of wax. Luckily we will still be able to have candlelight dinner with My New Flame. This unconventional centerpiece, by London based designer Moritz Waldemeyer, uses LED technology to faithfully recreate the experience of light from the ancient past. Thanks to an algorithm that makes sure the sequence of movements never repeats, My New Flame mimics the natural behavior of fire accurately.

The digital candle is less polluting and more sustainable than smoldering old fashioned wax candles, but not for our wallet, as it costs $600. If you can afford it, we suggest you to use it to create the perfect atmosphere for a virtual dinner.

Source: The Creators Project

Hypermaterials

Bioplastic Made of Pressed Insect Shells

Coleoptera by Aagje Hoekstra is certainly not the last bio-based project at the Dutch Design Week, but is a very interesting one for sure. Aagje’s approach is aimed at an already industrially ‘used’ insect. In the Netherlands mealworms are bred for the animal food industry. The mealworm eventually becomes the mealworm beetle which dies three to four months after laying its eggs. As there’s no use for them anymore their bodies are thrown away. However the beetle’s armor contains the substance chitin which is eventually converted to chitosan. These ‘chitosan shields’ can be pressed on to each other to form a paper-thin material. We see quirky, though beautiful, looking artifacts as a result.

Are quirky artifacts the beginning of a large-scale transition from our plastic world to a hybrid of organisms? Will the industry continue where the arts halted, or are we still repulsed by the idea of fungi kitchen appliances and mealworm lamps? Perhaps next years DDW will tell.

This article was originally published on Next Nature Lab

Fake-for-Real

Food To Eat With Your Eyes

Anything can be made” claims one of the many producer of plastic food.
In Japan, fake food industry represents a century of old crafting tradition and a multi billion business.

Restaurants proudly show inviting vitrines of hyper-realistic replicas of food and drinks. Why? Japanese like to “eat with their eyes”. But what is really entertaining about it lies behind the scene, where extremely fascinating production techniques have been developed over time to create the most amazing results.

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Designed-by-Evolution

Breaking Down Plastics with Bacteria

Following in 16-year old Daniel Burd’s footsteps, who developed a microorganism that can rapidly biodegrade plastic, high schoolers Miranda Wang and Jeanny Yao found a way to break down plastics using soil bacteria.

In this TED Talk the two Vancouver students explain how, on just a whim, they came across bacteria in the Fraser River capable of destroying plastics.
While it is exciting to have such young talents discovering plastic eating bacteria, should we fear the rising of a wild and unpredictable next nature?
Via TED

Anthropocene

Nature Learned to Turn Plastic into Rocks

Scientists have found rocks formed from plastic on Hawaiian shores. This discovery indicates that plastic litter can merge with natural elements, forming a new material: plastiglomerate.

This fusion could become part of the geological record, marking the Anthropocene and the human impact on the Earth’s ecosystems.
Looking on the bright side, plastic being able to fuse with shell and rocks could be exploited for the creation of artificial coral reefs.

Nature always finds a way, if she can’t get rid of plastic, she turn it into rocks.

Read more on Science Mag

Food Technology

The Bottle of The Future is an Edible Blob

Like in a microcosm, what if we could drink from a giant drop of water?
The bottle of the future has the shape of a soft, hygienic, biodegradable and edible blob, where the liquid is kept together by a solution of brown algae and calcium chloride.

Ooho is a project from the Spanish trio Skipping Rocks Lab that represents a brilliant  solution to the major international issue of plastic bottle waste.

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