Tag: Plastic Planet

Global-Image-Economy

Zero-Waste Grocery Store

A four-strong team of young women from Germany launch a shopping revolution: with their crowdfunded supermarket Original Unverpackt they’re going to ban disposable packages. The shop will open its doors in late summer in Berlin Kreuzberg.

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Anthropocene

Nature Learned to Turn Plastic into Rocks

Scientists have found rocks formed from plastic on Hawaiian shores. This discovery indicates that plastic litter can merge with natural elements, forming a new material: plastiglomerate.

This fusion could become part of the geological record, marking the Anthropocene and the human impact on the Earth’s ecosystems.
Looking on the bright side, plastic being able to fuse with shell and rocks could be exploited for the creation of artificial coral reefs.

Nature always finds a way, if she can’t get rid of plastic, she turn it into rocks.

Read more on Science Mag

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Green Blues

Reducing Plastic Bags by 80%

We all know about the plastic pollution problem that affects our Plastic Planet; we already reported about smart solutions such as the Ocean Cleanup Array and the microorganism that can biodegrade plastic.

Now there comes finally a European Union action whose goal is to reduce the consumption of the one-way disposable bags within 5 years by 80 percent.

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Food Technology

The Bottle of The Future is an Edible Blob

Like in a microcosm, what if we could drink from a giant drop of water?
The bottle of the future has the shape of a soft, hygienic, biodegradable and edible blob, where the liquid is kept together by a solution of brown algae and calcium chloride.

Ooho is a project from the Spanish trio Skipping Rocks Lab that represents a brilliant  solution to the major international issue of plastic bottle waste.

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Made-to-debate

Building a Boat with Marine Plastic Trash

Cleaning beaches and oceans from trash by transforming it in something useful and entitled to float on water.
A young man from Lamu, Kenya, collected tourists’ disused slippers and seaborne plastic bottles and threw them back to the ocean in the form of a boat.

Even if the ship doesn’t look seaworthy, it is a clear statement of the impact of plastic accumulation in marine environments. Peculiar object of the week.

Source: AfriGadget

Related post: Essay: Plastic Planet

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Humane-Technology

Plastic Pollution Solution

It seemed an impossible challenge to clean the ocean from plastic pollution, until now. Dutch Technology student Boyan Slat says he may have found a way to remove disposed from seawater. He has a solution to clean oceans in five years, and make it profitable.

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Designed-by-Evolution

Bowerbirds’ Plastic Love Nest

The male bowerbird has a colorful way to sededuce females. To attract them, the male builds peculiar structures, decorated with colorful plastic ornaments. They collect all kinds of bright colored small objects, and place them visibly outside their love nest.

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Fake-nature

Marine Plastic Creatures

Australia-based photographer Kim Preston draws the attention on plastic pollution of marine ecosystems. With a series of brilliant pictures, titled Plastic Pacific, she explores the devastating impact of plastics accumulation in the oceans by transforming everyday household objects into sea creatures.

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mushroom packaging
Guided Growth

Mushrooms to Grow Surfboards, Shoes, and Even Your House

Gather mushroom spores, grow them in a mold with agricultural waste, and you’ve just created the newest alternative to toxic styrofoam packing. The mushroom enthusiasts over at Ecovative have figured out a way to harness the abilities of mushroom root systems, called mycelium, to bind together organic substrates. By drying these mushroomy matrixes, Ecovative can create a material that’s strong, lightweight, and most importantly, cost-competitive with petroleum-based packaging. The company hopes to branch out into shoes, surfboards, furniture and building materials. A house that sprouts shiitakes and chanterelles is just a nice side benefit.

Read the full story over at Architect’s Newspaper.

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