Tag: Recreation

a replicate female period on a computer chip
Intimate Technology

Female Menstrual Cycle on a Computer Chip

The female reproductive complex is a truly complicated system made of organs and changing hormones that can seem quite obscure at times, even to a woman herself. Recently scientists managed to reproduce the entire menstrual cycle in the laboratory for the first time ever. All on a computer chip of the size of a hand, visually not resembling anything we carry in our body.

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device that recycles glass bottles into sand
Recreation

Turning Glass Bottles into Sand

New Zealand is famous for its old nature: mountains, beaches, rivers, lakes and a lot of national parks to be protected. Newzealanders also do love beer, but obviously not the trash that is left behind after evening drinks at the beach. For that reason the New Zealand brewery DB Breweries designed a device that immediately turn empty glass bottles into sand!

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Spangled Cotinga male
Recreation

Color Lessons from the Cotinga Bird

You don’t need to be a birdwatcher to appreciate the magnificent colors of the feathers of the male spangled cotinga flaunt. This bird finds its natural habitat in the canopy of the Amazonian Rainforest and has captivated the curiosity of scientists and bird fanatics for decades. Its dazzling blue body and deep red throat contain no pigment. The color effect is created by the shape of the material. This is known as structural coloration. Now researchers at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) together with Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) have found a way to imitate these biological nanostructures and potentially replace the pigments we use today.

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3D Printed Nefertiti Bust
Society of Simulations

3D Print Your Own Nefertiti Bust

At the beginning of 2016, two artists made a 3D scan of the Nefertiti bust in the Neues Museum in Berlin and uploaded it to the Internet. It caused an international fuss, with people wondering if they truly scanned the bust of Nefertiti themselves, and if so, with what tools? Did they scan a replica? Or did they hack the servers of the museum to steal the 3D scan? Does it even matter if the scan is fake, real or fake for real?

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Hallstatt in China
Manufactured Landscapes

Copy-Paste City: from Austria to China

As the saying goes “imitation is the sincerest form of flattery”, so Hallstatt – a small UNESCO World Heritage city in central Austria – can feel really proud. Among numerous fake Italian villas and French palaces, it is the only village in the world entirely copied and rebuilt in China. State-owned developer Minmetals constructed it in the suburbs of Huizhou, in the southern part of the country.

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extinct bison to be reintroduced in europe
Recreation

Re-introducing Extinct Species

Rewilding Europe is a Dutch organization which aims to the re-introduction of long-lost species in Europe’s wilderness. They are starting with the re-wilding of the European bison, an extinct species that used to dominate our countrysides, but was then hunted to extinction by 1919. Thanks to this initiative, and the support of 54 zoos, their population counts 3.000 animals today. Their objective is to re-introduce five herds of 100 bisons by 2022 and a wild population of 1.000 by 2032.

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Augmented Bodies

Human Cloning Now Possible in China

Human Cloning is one of those issues where technology is racing well ahead of contemporary morals and ethical frameworks. Xu Xiaochun, the chief executive behind the world’s biggest cloning factory – Boyalife Group – has stated that at this moment, the technology to clone humans is already available, and that they are refraining from using it for fear of public reaction.

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Recreation

Space Archeologist Unlocks Secrets of Ancient Civilizations

Sarah Parcak is a pioneering “satellite archaeologist” from University of Alabama, a sort of Indiana Jones with 21st century tech. She has been awarded the 2016 TED Prize for her work applying infrared imagery from satellites to help locate ancient sites lost in time. Her revolutionary methods helped her discover ancient cities and astonishing sites around the world, but especially in Egypt, where she came across 17 unknown pyramids, more than 1000 tombs and 3100 settlements.

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Hyperreality

Seeing the Sun Through Data

Between its 149 million km distance from earth and its extreme brightness, the sun has never been easy to observe. Ever since we started looking into the sky we’ve needed special lenses, photographs, telescopes and sunglasses to get the slightest glance at it. Today however, with more advanced imaging technology and orbiting telescopes, we’re getting a better look. The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space museum has taken this observation to the next level with a giant public display of images and data that show the sun in hyper-real detail.

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