Tag: Remediation


Mark Zuckerberg Discovers ‘Books’

The Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg made a New Year’s resolution to read a book every other week, and last week he invited his 30 million Facebook followers to join him in what could become the world’s largest book club.

“I’m excited for my reading challenge. I’ve found reading books very intellectually fulfilling,” Zuckerberg said in a post. “Books allow you to fully explore a topic and immerse yourself in a deeper way than most media today.”

Hooray for Mark! And his book club is so influential that the paperback version of the first book Zuck chose to read for the group,”The End of Power” has now sold out on Amazon. Naturally we have a special book recommendation for Mark.


The Mood Ring of the 21th Century

Have you ever worn a mood ring? Rings that were thought to be able to indicate ones mood through color. Whether they were reliable or not, people have been wearing them since their introduction in the mid ’70s and are still wearing them today. Currently, a Finnish design company called Moodmetric is trying to give these trinkets a modern face lift by making them digital.

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Boomeranged Metaphors

3000 Years Old 8-Bit Music Instrument

It could be a coincidence, but the Super Mario Brothers theme sounds like the sheng tone, an old Chinese instrument dated back to 1100 B.C.
The more iconic video game audio track played with an ancient woodwind. The resulting sound is pure 1980s nostalgia, it resembles to 8-bit synthesized electronic music produced by the sound chips of vintage computers, video game consoles, and arcade machines.
It makes wonder if Nintendo actually used the sheng in their sound effect conceptualization.

Source: Gizmondo
Related post: Technostalgia


Peculiar Transportations


Last friday, these curious next natural transportations happened around our office in Amsterdam. All within the timeframe of a few hours. The surrealists where right. Have a nice weekend.

Innovative Nostalgia

A New Old Way to Share Pictures

There was a certain charm in projectors: gather the family, focus the transparencies by twisting the lens barrel and sit back to enjoy the slideshow. Now that we take pictures with the smartphone most of the time, this ritual doesn’t exist anymore.

Instead of having those digital pictures crowding the outer space, you can now view them thanks to Projecteo, a mini Instagram projector for when you feel nostalgic.
The device is made up of an LED light and three watch-size batteries to make sharing photos an analog snap. From the Projecteo website, users pick nine Instagram images to develop onto a piece of 35mm film, to fit inside the projector’s corresponding mini reel. Innovative nostalgia, indeed!

Innovative Nostalgia

Innovative Nostalgia

A battle is underway between designers and engineers; at stake is the design of our technological future. It rages subtly like a moorland fire. Koert van Mensvoort adds fuel to the flames, but also offers a solution. The impact of new technology on our lives is hard to overestimate. Read more


Technostalgia for the Cassette Tape

Seattle designer Jeff Skierka might suffer from technostalgia, since he was inspired by the good old days to reinvent the obsolete audio tape in the shape of a coffee table. Handmade from reclaimed maple wood on a 12:1 scale, the table is reversible, just like a real cassette tape.

This peculiar piece of furniture is a good example of technostalgia, wherein we idolize old-fashioned technologies in response to what feels like an overwhelming rate of technological change. In technostalgia, we recreate our past and give it new meaning in the present.

Back to the Tribe

Walter Benjamin on Film and the Senses

During the late 1930’s the philosopher Walter Benjamin wrote its widely influential essay ‘The work of Art in the Age of Its Technical Reproducibility’. While describing a general shift in the arts and their perception and warning about the possible exploitation for political purposes his work examines carefully the medium, especially photography and film, and its sensual aspects.[1] He attributes a tactile and palpable quality to film that elevates the medium and stresses its meaning for the human collective.

Benjamin formulates a historical task of film, ‘which is to gain control over technology and its effects.’[2] For him, film is an exercise for the senses to adapt ourselves. It were the ‘successive changes of scene and focus’ that were ‘a true training ground’ of modern perception.[3] Film thus corresponds to the changes that each passerby experiences in big-city traffic.[4] On the one hand the ‘filmic stimuli transcend the category of purely optical impressions’, on the other hand they stay safely or visually enframed in the screen.[5]

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