Tag: Sentient Spaces


Speculative Sensing at WDCD 2015

On may 21st, Next Nature Network art director Hendrik-Jan Grievink will host a workshop around the idea of Speculative Sensing: exploring the potential of senses found in nature and fiction, such as echolocation, infrared sight or telepathy. The workshop will be held during the 5th edition of What Design Can Do, an international event about the impact of design.

Read more


Ambient City

Today, 54% of the world’s population lives in urban areas, a percentage that is expected to increase to 66% by 2050. Will the city eventually be the nextnatural habitat for humans, like the beehive is for bees?

The forthcoming Ars Electronica investigates the ambient city theme, questioning how cities will function when there are more robots than people working in factories, everything is intelligently interlinked, autos drive autonomously and drones deliver the mail.

Manufactured Animals

A Swarm of Micro Drones

Researchers at GRASP Laboratory have developed agile micro drones able to act like a swarm. The drones are capable of complex motion behavior, either as individual units or as a group. Each unit contains several sensors, allowing the micro drone to stabilize itself in mid-air and recover from unexpected errors.

While the drones still require external localization, the results represent the first steps towards the development of advanced swarm behavior within drones. This could have a major impact on the future of automated unmanned aerial vehicles, commercial airlines or even flying cars.

Intimate Technology

St. Pauli’s Walls Pee Back On You

Tired of drunk people emptying the bladder everywhere on the street, citizens of St. Pauli, Hamburg decided to take a smart step to prevent it. They coated the walls of the city with superhydrophobic coating; so that whenever someone pees on the wall, it will pee on them.

Story via Digg


Communicating with City Infrastructures

With the Internet of Things, a growing number of objects have sensors implanted inside them. These sensors help to form a network where objects can communicate with each other and with us. A recent project, named GENESI, might make it possible for city infrastructures to join this conversation as well.

Read more

sharks on twitter

Over 300 Sharks are Now on Twitter

Twitter is steadily growing its user base. Recently 338 sharks in Western Australia subscribed to the microblogging service. They are now tweeting out where they are.

Australian researchers have tagged 338 sharks with acoustic transmitters that monitor where the animals swim. When a tagged shark is about half a mile away from a beach, it triggers a computer alert, which tweets out a message on the Surf Life Saving Western Australia Twitter feed. The tweet notes the shark’s size, breed and approximate location.

Read more


Anti-Drone Tent

Sarah van Sonsbeecks Anti Drone Tent is a small construction of emergency blankets that blocks infrared sensing, making it invisible to drones.

Isn’t it ironic. While originally humans started employing technology to emancipate ourselves from the forces of old nature – think of a roof above your head to withstand wind and rain – these technologies over time caused the rising of a next nature. And we now need to emancipate ourselves from the forces of technology.

The Anti Drone tent is currently on display at the Drone Camping at Mediamatic.


Robot Swarm that can form any Shape

A team or Harvard researchers developed a self assembling swarm of 1000 robots that can form any shape. Inspired by flock behavior in old nature – think birds, fish or ants – the scientists created an algorithm that allows a flock of simple robots to assemble in any given shape.

The researchers expect that in the future such swarms of robots could help cleaning oil spills, provide immediate emergency help at a disaster site, or guide millions of self driving cars.

Read more


What’s the Point If We Can’t Have Fun?

Since Darwin we tend to look at the biological world exclusively in economical terms. The idea that monkey’s, frogs, or even ants do more than simply propagate, doesn’t find much acceptance among scientists. And yet, even crayfishes at times seem to displace objects just for fun.

My friend June Thunderstorm and I once spent a half an hour sitting in a meadow by a mountain lake, watching an inchworm dangle from the top of a stalk of grass, twist about in every possible direction, and then leap to the next stalk and do the same thing. And so it proceeded, in a vast circle, with what must have been a vast expenditure of energy, for what seemed like absolutely no reason at all.

“All animals play,” June had once said to me. “Even ants.” She’d spent many years working as a professional gardener and had plenty of incidents like this to observe and ponder. “Look,” she said, with an air of modest triumph. “See what I mean?”

Read more